Twenty years later the Bauer Reactor is back

Bauer Reactor 4000 Sr. Goalie Pads

Bauer Reactor 4000 Sr. Goalie Pads

Back in 1994 goaltenders wearing Bauer goal pads were all wearing the Reactor line. Big names like Dominik Hasek and Mike Richter were sporting the equipment and leading the NHL in the gear. 20 years later Bauer has come back to the Reactor.

Serving as an extension and evolution of the Reflex line of goal pads that was developed when Bauer and Itech merged, the Reactor is a pro-style butterfly pad that is specifically designed for a hybrid style of play. Unlike the Supreme TotalOne line which is a true butterfly style, flat-faced pad, the Reactor is more of a hybrid style pad. Bauer even gave the style associated with the Reactor a buzzword in their 2013 catalog: Battlefly.

That seems like an appropriate way to describe the pad and the style of the goaltenders that would wear this type of pad. Just looking at some of the players around the league wearing them now (Brian Elliott and Ilya Bryzgalov), they employ a butterfly-first mentality but use various pieces of other styles in their repertoire.

These are flexible pads that introduce a triangle outer roll which puts a slight pitch on the outer roll of the pads. The 6000 Pro Custom pads also come stock with a double knee break but different break options are available on the pad.

Beyond the 6000 Pro model, the 4000 and 4000x offer top-end performance without needing a custom build. The 4000x actually utilized the myFlex feature that is prevalent throughout the TotalOne line. This is a piece of technology that allows the goaltender to determine what kind of flex option they wish to have on their pads.

The newest introduction to the Reactor line is the Pro Core insert. This serves as the “brain” of the pad that is designed to give a soft feel to the pad but maintaining the firmness needed to maintain a proper S-shape and limit the pad from breaking down over time. Combined with the triangle outer roll and the reintroduction of the Flexx Darts gives the Reactor pad a phenomenal blend of traditional construction that creates a flexible lightweight pad that is conducive to a number of different styles.

In terms of the eye test, the Reactor passes with flying colors. Bauer built off the Reflex pattern while extending the graphic upwards. This creates a dynamic, linear graphic that looks good in a number of styles.

Looking at the overall construction and appearance of the pad, this reminds me of what the Velocity was when it was first introduced. A soft, reactive pad that allows a goaltender to play a number of styles.

There are three models in the Reactor line; the 6000 Pro, 4000 and 2000. The 4000 and 2000 each have a senior model with the 2000 covering junior pads. The glove and blocker aren’t too far removed from the Reflex line in design and use. Both draw their lineage to the flexible leg pads by offering flexible cuff options that will react well when used with your chest & arm protector.

The catch glove is a single-T pocket construction with skate lace for the pocket lacing. Skate lace is more durable than regular twine lacing but can be more difficult to keep in shape. As for the blocker, the one piece thumb and outer hand protection really stands out. It is not obtrusive and has a good looking construction in terms of offer complete protection and coverage.

As someone who counts the original Reactor line amongst my favorite goal pads of all time, I’m glad to see this equipment make a comeback; particularly in a style that suits the kind of game I try to play.