Hockey Fitness: Summer Training

Now that we’re officially in the dog days of summer, you’ve probably had plenty of time to spend at the beach, hanging with friends and possibly getting some ice from time to time with friends or even rec teams. But with summer heading towards the finish and tryouts and the regular season closing in, it is time to whip yourself into game shape.

There are a million and one hockey workouts for the summer online and they’re all great. For the most part you can find a host of programs that focus on weight, endurance and cross training to ensure you get a full body workout while you’re away from the rink on a regular basis.

The beauty of a summer workout is that you can vary the exercises you wish to focus on. Is this an offseason where you want to put on solid weight? Are you looking to build explosiveness and foot speed? Or maybe you’re looking to get back into game shape with a simple, well-rounded workout routine.

Regardless of your primary focus, a sound cardiovascular element is vital. Whether it’s on a stationary bike, roller blades, bicycle or jogging, make sure you build in an adequate amount of time for a proper cardio workout. Few things are going to help keep your third period legs fresh than a run or bike ride in the heat of July and August.

Mixing in different cardio elements will aid in building different muscle groups while keeping the primary focus on your cardiovascular health and building some of the endurance you may have lost catching up on the tan you lost during the winter. One other key to your cardio work out is to keep varying levels to the workout. Interval training is a great way to not only maintain endurance but also build explosive and high-tempo bursts (much like shifts in a game) into that training.

As for the weight and strength training aspect, the key is a full body focus. Keep the focus on specific muscle groups and ensure that each day’s workout is collectively going to improve that muscle group. One practice I picked up from working with various trainers is the concept of supersetting work outs.

This may not necessarily be the practice that you wish to pursue, but using a superset workout will not only allow you to mix in multiple exercises at once, but can provide for full body movement as opposed to single-muscle exercises that you may be used to.

The final element, if you hadn’t already worked this in, is core strength and agility. While a lot of agility drills work very well in a cardio setting, they can definitely be done individually and when combined with core strengthening workouts can serve as a tremendous compliment to the typical cardio and strength training programs you’ve used in the past.

Ultimately your summer workout is yours to build. Goalies may be only concerned with lower body focus, cardio and a high level of agility training to increase their side-to-side mobility and effectiveness for the coming season. Maybe some defensemen are trying to add weight and strength for added physicality as their regular season is set to begin. Or perhaps you need to get back in shape and ready for training camp and a full-circuit workout is just what the doctor ordered.

Do your research, see what other players are doing and make sure that you keep a broad focus on the entire practice.

On the Ice: Easton Mako skates

Easton Mako Ice Hockey Skate

Easton Mako Ice Hockey Skates

Our second installment of On the Ice comes in a different gear category than the initial review of the Warrior Dynasty stick. I’ve been able to try out a pair of Easton’s newest skate, the Mako.

The Mako is a new release from Easton and actually is a standalone product compared to the Stealth skate line which offers a number of different models to select. The focus of this skate is all about speed. From the heat moldable composite upper, the new CXN holder, aggressive pitch angle and the new Extendon feature, the Mako is designed for the sole purpose of speed.

With a composite construction the Mako skate is incredibly light and that feature is something that is noticeable from the first time you take it off the wall. However, the boot design offers more than just weight reduction. Easton’s asymmetrical design is focused to increase side-to-side agility for the player. In addition, the aggressively angle of the boot and holder offer a forward pitch that is not only conducive for straight ahead speed but also cornering and agility.

These features help to promote Easton’s new “Art of Speed” slogan. However, they aren’t just window dressings. The aggressive forward pitch and lightweight construction are complimented by the Extendon guard; built to promote the natural stride of a hockey player. The Extendon is a new take on the typical tendon guard on a normal pair of skates – and it does take a little getting used to. The slightly longer guard is designed to not only promote full extension in loading your stride but also immediate recovery after pushing off. It almost serves like a rubberband in a sense; aiding the skater in each and every stride.

The general look of the skate is somewhat odd, especially if you’re someone who is used to a traditional skate with a black boot and white holder. However, the sharp orange accents the compliment the black and silver on the boot looks pretty great. In fact, for as funky of a design this skate has, it passes the mirror test with flying colors.

It’s also appealing to more and more NHL professionals. Easton athletes like Derek Roy were wearing the Mako throughout this season and it was gaining a strong foothold (no pun intended) with the professional crowd. For a regular guy like myself, if was thoroughly impressed with the skate.

Out of the Box

If there is one thing that needs to be impressed upon anyone considering this skate it is that you cannot judge the fit before you bake it. Not only is the entire boot thermally formed but the tongue is as well. When you first put the skate on it is stiff, narrow and rather unforgiving. In fact, it is incredibly difficult to lace prior to being baked. However, once these are baked they are an entirely different skate. Your foot will slide into the boot like butter and once you’re laced up the skate actually wraps itself around your foot.

The reason I feel it is so important to impress this upon you is because this skate is designed to be fully customized to the wearer’s foot. While other skate models feel better once they’ve been baked, the Mako has to be baked. The result ends up being a ridiculously comfortable skate that is formed around your entire foot.

The Extendon feels a little different when you first get the skates on and it is because it sits a little closer to your leg (as it is designed to move back and forth with your stride) which creates an unusual sensation when you first lace up the skates. However the adjustment period for that is short as there is no discomfort created by the feature.

Another thing that threw me off was the tongue. It is fully heat formed and has a thick plastic insert on the top. Before baking it is somewhat cumbersome and difficult to deal with. Once you’ve baked the skates it is pliable and ends up contouring around the top of your foot and up through the ankle. Like with the initially stiff boot, the tongue is a completely different piece of the puzzle after the skates spend some time in the oven.

On the Ice

While I needed to wait a couple of weeks to get these on the ice, I didn’t have a ton of time to break them in at home. Aside from lacing them up a couple of times while watching TV, the skates didn’t get too much time to be broken in prior to their first ice time. This was a major concern for me at my first game in them.

Yet, after my first game I felt no ill effects. I didn’t have any blisters, my feet weren’t sore and I was amazed that after baking the skate and sporting it for a couple of hours at home that these were game ready. While your experience may differ a bit, I’ve found that most who are using the Mako determined they are all but game ready after getting baked and forming to your feet.

I have to say this was a major relief to me after watching my college teammates suffer through breaking in skates year after year.

The biggest adjustment for me on the ice was the forward pitch of these skates. Coming from CCM Pro Tacks, I was used to a flatter attack angle and a wider boot. The Mako has a much more pronounced forward pitch in addition to a more narrow fit. While the fit itself never became an issue, I found myself a little wobbly when I took my first few spins around on the skates. In fact, I had one moment early in the game in which I took twice the amount of time to turnaround than I usually would because I was still unsure on my feet.

What does all of that mean? Are these that difficult to get used to? The answer is no. By the midpoint of the first period I had fully settled into the skates and I can now say after a few ice times that these are a truly incredible product.

I am by no means a fast skater. In fact I’d contend that while technically sound I am actually brutally slow. Yet I’ve noticed my strides have been more powerful lately and my straight line speed has actually increased. The reason I can say that this is so noticeable is the way the skate feels if you take hard, aggressive strides. The construction of the boot and holder are so conducive to complimenting the motion of skating that you do feel the skate reacting with you as you go up and down the ice.

Easton hit it out of the park with the Mako skate. It is a highly evolved product that gives you noticeable results when you wear them. So long as you understand the difference in fit between the skate out of the box and the skate out of the oven, I’m confident that this would be on top of everyone’s shopping list when they’re looking for new skates.

Industry Q&A with Mike Mountain about the new Easton VSeries sticks

Easton V - Series Composite Hockey Sticks

The Easton V – Series Composite Hockey Sticks. coming soon to Greatskate.com

A new feature for the blog, we will be sitting down with professional hockey players and industry professionals for a series of Q&As. For our first Q&A we were granted an exclusive opportunity to as Mike Mountain of Easton Hockey a few questions about their newest stick line, the VSeries.

Great Skate: Easton has always managed to raise the bar with each stick they release. What about the new stick line, that you can share, will raise the bar again?

Mike Mountain: The VSeries is really a product of a couple years working with premier shooting instructors and getting a better understanding of shooting mechanics.  We wanted to understand what makes the best goal scorers and then build a product that works with that technique better than anything out there.  We learned that the best players are loading the blade and shooting the puck off the toe.  Our engineers then created the patent pending Hypertoe construction.  It is a series of tapered ribs in the toe of the blade to create additional stiffness and response.

 GS: The Art of Speed is the tagline Easton has been using on the new gear coming out, including the new Mako Skates. Is it safe to say the new stick line will build on the Art of Speed legacy?

MM: Speed is at the core of everything we do.  In sticks we are focused on velocity.  How you achieve it is to create load and release in both the shaft and blade.  Everything that went into the line from patterns and flex’s to coatings and stick lengths are done to create load and release for a maximum velocity.

 GS: Is it correct that the V9E will be the flagship of the new stick line or will there be another model to accompany it?

MM: The V9E and V9 will headline the VSeries.  Both sticks will have the Hypertoe construction in the blade while the V9E will have the elliptical profile and the V9 will have a tapered profile.

GS: It has been cool to see various NHLers using prototype sticks this season without any logos. What can we expect with the V9E color and logo scheme?

MM: You will see those same players transition to the new look in the first round of the playoffs.  We wanted them to truly feel the difference of the new construction and not be swayed by graphics.  The response we got was great in terms of a noticeable performance advantage.

GS: Will the VSeries carry the matte look that the Stealth line has popularized?

MM: They will, we have also added a textured shaft coating that goes along with it.

 GS: In addition to the elliptical profile on the V9E will there also be a model with a traditional taper too?

MM: The VSeries will include a V9E, V5E and V1E with an elliptical profile as well as a V9, V7 and V3 with a tapered profile.

GS: What’s your favorite feature or addition about the new line?

MM: We have added a new pattern to our line, the E36.  It is a lie 5 mid curve with a dual lie and slightly open face.  Like the E28, this pattern forces your hands in the correct position in front of the puck while positioning the heel slightly off the ice in order to load the blade.  The junior version has been engineered specifically for younger players with the curve slightly towards the toe to provide better control.  So far the reception to this pattern has been phenomenal with players.

Composite Mini Sticks

Bauer Vapor APX Mini Stick

Manufacturers bring top-end sticks to childhood favorite

 

Manufacturers bring top-end sticks to childhood favorite

Knee hockey is one of the numerous things that makes hockey what it is. Not many sports have a portable, miniature version that can be played just about anywhere.

Just think back to travel tournaments and the countless hotel hallways you were expelled from when playing knee hockey. Knee hockey just happens to be a portion of hockey culture that makes our sport so incredibly unique.

Not unlike the full size version of the sport, knee hockey has seen a number of advances in recent years. Manufacturers now make miniature nets (not necessarily a new development) which inevitably saves desks, tables, chairs and hallway radiators from the beating that comes along with the game. In addition, the days of dipping your straight-blade plastic stick in boiling water to create a curve are over. Now you can choose a mini stick from a plethora of choices that are near mirror images to the full size sticks made by hockey’s biggest manufacturers.

Warrior, Bauer, CCM, Reebok and Sher-Wood all have created their own composite mini sticks complete with curves and identical design patterns to that of the full size retail sticks you use on the ice. What these sticks do is add a little style and extra performance to a rec-room or travel tournament classic.

Reebok not only has a mini composite version of their new 20K stick, they also introduced a composite goal stick that is patterned after the 11K composite goal stick that is being used throughout the NHL – this follows previous miniature versions of the O-Stick and A.I.9. CCM also produced a mini composite of their premier stick with a mini RBZ. Like the 20K, the mini RBZ also sports the same markings and art that the top model does – although it doesn’t provide some of the technological advances that the full size stick does.

Both CCM and Reebok have their own net models as well which can be set up in your basement or rec room to add even more of an ice element to each knee game.

Bauer actually has a Vapor APX and TotalOne NXG for you to choose from while Sher-Wood’s collection spans the entire NHL. So, for those of you who are nostalgic for the straight plastic, team-branded sticks of the past, perhaps the Sher-Wood team models would provide a nice transition.

While I can’t attest if the composite mini sticks can add performance to your knee hockey game as their full-size cousins do for ice hockey, I can say they bring a cool wrinkle to a game that you should never need an excuse to play.

I, for one, am seriously considering setting up a knee hockey rink as part of my man cave in the very near future.

NHL Trade Deadline looms with big names on the table

NHL Trade Deadline Looms with big names in play

NHL Trade Deadline Looms with big names in play

One of the most exciting and interesting days of the hockey season is nearly upon us. With just seven

days until the deadline, general managers all over the NHL are positioning themselves to deal a number

of assets before the deadline passes next Wednesday.

 

The trade deadline hasn’t been the firework filled affair that it was a few seasons back, when teams

would swap assets willingly, but rather a day of measured decisions that has been impacted by in-

season deals.

 

Thanks to Ray Shero’s brilliant maneuvering, the Penguins managed to add a trio of well-seasoned

veterans to a roster that was already teeming with talent. As a team expected to be a major buyer,

the Penguins haven’t disappointed. Even after acquiring Brenden Morrow and Douglas Murray last

week, Shero managed to pull an 11th hour deal for Jarome Iginla to polish off a roster only found on the

memory of an Xbox or Playstation.

 

Things may shift significantly with Iginla off the market. Since the deadline’s biggest name has already

moved, there may only be ancillary trades made for most of the day next Wednesday. That isn’t to say

that there won’t be any shocking deals – there always is – but the expectations will certainly be lower

than they were before the Iginla deal went down.

 

If you’re holding out hope that this deadline will have some fireworks, pin your hopes to the fact that

the salary cap for next season is dropping and there will be teams looking to get out from under heavy

contracts. If a team is desperate enough, there might just be some big names moved.

 

Down at one Seymour H Knox III Plaza, Darcy Regier is likely working the phones on a handful of hockey

trades. Local media (and some national media) have wondered if Jason Pominville, Ryan Miller or even

Thomas Vanek could be on the block as the Sabres look to hit the reset button on their roster.

 

I, for one, think that Regier could find solid value for Pominville and Miller. However, he may be better

suited to shop that pair in the offseason as the league’s general managers have a better idea of how

they will settle into next year’s cap situation.

 

Maybe Regier will managed to pull the trigger on a blockbuster trade that ships out one of the team’s

core leaders before the clock strikes midnight on the third. However, I expect to see at least three trades

come from the Sabres. Two will be to ship out potential rental players (see: Regehr and Leopold) while

the third will be a textbook hockey trade.

 

Regier made a brilliant move last year when he sent Zack Kassian and Marc-Andre Gragnani to

Vancouver for Cody Hodgson and Alexander Sulzer. While Sulzer was a pleasant surprise, Hodgson has

blossomed into a dynamic scoring center. It was a trade that benefitted both organizations and went a

long way in addressing a primary need that the Sabres had. The same could be said of the deal he swung

to acquire Steve Ott and Adam Pardy. The Sabres gave up something, but also obtained pieces that can

be used now and in the future.

For a team in desperate need of a fresh start in a number of places, don’t be surprised to see Regier

swing a trade that not only improves the roster, but that you didn’t expect to see come through.

There are some names that keep cropping up in trade rumors, here are a few thoughts on each:

 

Ryane Clowe: Now that Iginla is off the market there isn’t necessarily one single pending UFA who could

be considered the gem of the deadline class. Clowe is one of those players that every team wants. He is

a gritty forward who isn’t afraid to get his nose dirty while adding a significant offensive touch. Granted,

he has gone a long while without scoring a goal this season, but he still has the type of intangibles that

playoff teams value.

 

Reports point to Clowe’s pricetag as a first round pick and a prospect. That is an awful lot to pay for a

rental who hasn’t scored a goal yet this season. However, for teams who are desperate for depth on the

wing, Clowe will be an attractive option.

 

Robyn Regehr/Jordan Leopold: For those fans in Buffalo, this hits a little closer to home. Both

defensemen have playoff experience, are upcoming free agents and are playing for a team that has been

said to be selling on everyone. Regehr has been connected to a number of Western Conference teams,

namely the LA Kings while Leopold has also had his name crop up in a number of circles.

 

While many fans may scoff at the idea of Regehr or Leopold fetching any sort of return, remember

that Regier managed to snage a first round pick for Paul Gaustad last season. While neither of these

defensemen would be worth that much, don’t be surprised if they bring back more than many were

expecting.

 

Derek Roy: Here is a name that has only been mentioned recently as some reporters have indicated that

he and the Stars haven’t been able to reach an agreement on a new contract. Aside from the fact that

the Steve Ott trade would look that much better for the Sabres, Roy could certainly be worthwhile on

the trade market.

 

Roy does have some limited playoff experience and is a gifted playmaker. He is also an adept faceoff

man who can kill penalties if need be. He is a valuable asset and could certainly fetch an impressive

price tag if the right team came calling. Considering that the Blackhawks and Kings missed out on Iginla, I

could see them kicking the tires on Roy.

 

Valterri Filppula: Filppula is one player who I don’t expect to get moved. While he is a pending free

agent, the Wings will likely look to keep him on board for this season’s playoffs and for the long-term as

they will soon see some of their world-class mainstays skate into retirement.

 

While Filppula would be a tremendous asset for any team to add, I’d also expect the asking price to be

high. One scenario I could envision would be a team looking to rebuild offered a number of pieces to the

Wings in exchange for Filppula (with the hope of re-signing him) and picks. While it might be unlikely,

that’s probably the only way he is moved.

 

Even if Iginla is the only name on this list who is traded next week, it will mark the biggest name moved

at the deadline in a number of years. Just for that alone, this will be a fun deadline to keep track of.

Easton Mako protective line reinforces Easton as a trendsetter

Easton Mako Shoulder Pads

Easton Mako Shoulder Pad

Easton Mako protective line reinforces Easton as a trendsetter

Easton entered 2013 fresh off a year in which the Stealth RS and Mako sticks made a big splash on the hockey world.

In terms of aesthetics alone, the Mako and Stealth’s clean look were monster hits with hockey players everywhere. The weight and performance of each stick brought them to the top of the heap when comparing the products that hit the market in 2012.

Easton’s prowess in stick making is well documented, going all the way back to the Synergy. In addition previous skate and glove lines have maintained impressive staying power in the hockey world. This year, the foremost leader in stick technology has taken a new and aggressive approach with their protetive equipment.

Brand new lines that bear the Stealth and Mako names are to be released and they both bring a new wrinkle to what options players have to wear underneath their uniform.

Both the Stealth and Mako lines feature a design rooted in maintaining a full range of motion for the wearer. The shoulder pads in particular focus on this with Easton’s Segmented FRM. However, that is where most of the comparisons will end.

While the elbow pads and pants for both lines share nearly identical traits, the shoulder pads and shin guards differ in many ways. The true variance is with the Mako line which has brought forth a number of new features and benefits as the Stealth protective gear is far more traditional in terms of features and design.

The new Mako shoulder pads is designed to provide an equally protective pad while utilizing lightweight and free moving design. This is accomplished with the new Conic Body Fit design feature which uses an asymmetric, cross-body closure and corresponding straps that adjust the entire unit.

The Conic Body Fit allows for almost an unobstructed range of motion for the player with a design that hinges around your back as opposed to over your shoulders. In addition to hinging in the back, the unit is built more like a shirt and less like a shawl (for lack of a better term). These two features minimizes the typical restrictions in twisting and rotating that a traditional shoulder pad – one that drapes you’re your shoulders – would have.

By providing a shoulder pad that fits and reacts in unison with your body, Easton is improving upon a method of maximizing protection (which this unit does) without limiting mobility.

The same type of features are found in the new Mako shin pad. Easton spent a great deal of time redeveloping the knee system in the pad in order to focus the center of gravity on that location while improving on the anatomical support.

In the same way that the Conic Body Fit system is designed to react to your upper body’s natural movement, the new anatomic knee on the shin guard is designed to move in unison with the natural bend of your knee.

Easton’s three-piece design incorporates a stiff, thick primary shin guard that covers an injected calf wrap which provides flexible wrap-around protection for the wearer.

What is particularly impressive about the Mako line is that a majority of the design features can be found with every model. This is not a protective line that leaves out features as you hit certain price points. While weight and performance will be limited when comparing the M3 to the Mako, the Conic Body Fit and other features aren’t ignored.

This – along with the Stealth – is an impressive line that shouldn’t be ignored the next time you’re at Great Skate shopping for protective equipment.

Get in to win a free pair of Easton Mako Ice Hockey Skates

Easton Mako Ice Hockey Skate

Get in to win a free pair of Easton Mako Ice Hockey Skates

The clean lines and styling of the Easton Mako Ice Hockey Skate are features that have made this one of the most popular skates models in all levels of hockey. Now Easton and Great Skate have teamed up for a contest to award one lucky player a brand new pair of Easton Mako Ice Hockey Skates.

In order to enter the contest, go to the Great Skate Facebook page, like us and enter your information for the contest.

In a world of stiff boots that lack anatomical characteristics and restrict movement, we believe in a new sense of freedom, performance and the Art of Speed by creating a skate that optimizes natural movement.

The push direction Asymmetrical patterns allow the skates to fall in line with direction of travel to generate speed and power through cornering. This not only looks great but keeps the skate performance high.

As mentioned, the fit of these skates gives a full range of motion to the foot, ultimately maximizing the Art of Speed and natural movements. Easton took the time to alter the skate this season in hopes of increasing the range of motion for a player while also maintaining the comfort and protection that has been an hallmark of these skates for sometime.

You can come into Great Skate and try on a pair and feel the difference for yourself.

Easton Mako II Composite Hockey Stick – QUICK HANDS EQUALS SPEED

Easton Mako II Composite Hockey Stick – QUICK HANDS EQUALS SPEED

Easton Mako II Composite Hockey Stick

Easton Mako II Composite Hockey Stick

The Mako 2 replaces the original Mako starting off with the shaft that is lighter than the original Easton Mako, and it’s slightly concave with texture using uni-directional fibers which make it stronger and lighter. The Blade has been lightened as well, and the ribs are actually shifted a bit upward increasing the area where puck meets blade.

Having said this when we tried out the new Easton Mako II the puck come off the blade really hot, makes for a better and a softer feel of the puck. Not only did Easton get this stick right but it has great color features by going back to the original black blade and keeping with tradition with the white shaft. If you would like to test this stick out and find out for yourself the difference please stop by our retail location and test the new Easton Mako II out in out shooting room. If you need help finding the right stick for yourself and can’t make it in please call us at 1-800-828-7496 or email us at greatskate@greatskate.com