MX3 Bauer Skates

MX3 Bauer Ice Hockey Skates

MX3 Bauer Skates

The newest alteration to Bauer’s Supreme line comes in the form of the TotalOne MX3.

Taking over the Supreme banner from the NXG skate, the new MX3 adds features that were originally unveiled with the APX2 line last year while also providing updates exclusive to the new line.

The MX3 features the TUUK Lightspeed Edge holder that features the trigger blade replacement system that came out on the APX2. Additionally, the MX3 also features Bauer’s revolutionary injected stability lace system. This is the square eyelet system that Bauer has developed to reduce or eliminate lace bite, allow the laces to glide through flat as opposed to twisting or catching and, finally, also providing for a better fit and forward flex for the skater. The square eyelets also remove the pesky round, metal eyelets of yesterday that could so easily rip out after excessive use.

Implementing the one-piece eyelet system was a no brainer for Bauer as they’ve taken such a committed approach to the anatomic design for the Supreme line. Further advances to the Curv composite upper design allows for the MX3 to provide a full 360-degree fit after the skate has been properly baked. This ensures a custom fit that’s an anatomically correct as possible.

Additional changes to the interior of the skate include a supple update to the HydraMax liner that’s already been a fan favorite from previous Supreme models.

Bauer has also developed a revolutionary new tongue system that allows a player to completely customize the shape and performance of their skate’s tongue. The 3Flex Tongue features Curv composite inserts that vary in stiffness depending on the type of flex you prefer. Much like a composite stick, the flex options are designed to act like a springboard as the player flexes forward and pushes off with each stride. Ultimately the goal is to provide a fully custom feel that allows the skate to spring backward as each stride is taken.

Another interesting feature is the features included in some of the lower models of the Supreme line. While only the MX3 offers the 3Flex tongue, HyrdaMax 2 liner and the Lightspeed Edge holder an number of features can be found on the 190, 180, 170 and 160. All four are capable of being fully baked, they each feature the Lightspeed Edge holder while the 190 and 180 also feature the Curv composite upper.

Overall the changes to the Supreme line are relatively minor compared to previous years. But the updates that were made provide an impressive upgrade to an already impressive line.

CCM going back to Tacks

CCM going back to Tacks

CCM going back to Tacks

The return is coming. CCM will be reintroducing the world to the Tacks line in the coming months as the manufacturer brings a new skate line to complement the RBZ line that burst onto the scene last year.

Already being used in the NHL, Nathan MacKinnon made the unofficial news official when he posted a picture of his new skates to his Instagram account earlier in the season. While MacKinnon’s picture simply added fuel to an already burning fire of rumors and whispers about the skates, the official unveiling of the line won’t come until July ‘14.

The Tacks, on the surface look like a combination of the RBZ and Bauer TotalOne in the aesthetics department. It’s a sleek skate with bright yellow graphics that pop off a basic black boot. The design of the boot has plenty of surface similarities to it’s cousin, the RBZ. Adding in a Speedblade 4.0 holder and Hyperglide blade provides even more similarity between the two skates. Additionally, you can deduce that the Tacks will share the aggressive stance and turning radius that the RBZ boasts.

The comparison to the TotalOne is simply drawn from the yellow trim on a black base. However, the Tacks will utilize a stiff carbon boot construction designed to add straight-line explosiveness. Two features, the AttackFrame and T6 Pro Core will combine to add stiffness and high-end performance for the wearer specifically for explosive acceleration.

Exactly where the skates will fall on the fit scale is an unknown as many specific details about the new line are still under lockdown. Understandably so as CCM is bringing back perhaps the most storied and celebrated skate ever and introducing new technology that will put it on the same level as the most popular skates in stores today.

2014 NHL Trade Deadline Primer

2014 NHL Trade Deadline Primer

2014 NHL Trade Deadline Primer

Just over seven days separate 30 general managers from the feeding frenzy that is the NHL trade deadline. Of course, recent years have resembled a salad bar more so than an all-you-can-eat buffet. While the blockbusters that fans and media love have become rare, the action at the deadline will still be there.

There are already a host of names floating around the rumor wires as real and make believe insiders and sources report on the whispers they hear about the players who will end up being moved in the coming days. Marquee names like Ryan Miller and Ryan Callahan are making the rounds with fans of contending teams are waiting to see what their GM can poach from the annual swap meet.

The 2014 deadline ought to provide a few fireworks specifically because of teams like the Sabres, Islanders and Oilers. All three are sliding towards the draft lottery in hopes that they win the right to pick first overall and each will likely unload some stars prior to the deadline.

Based on many reports, Edmonton appeared to be very close to dealing Sam Gagner to Los Angeles prior to the Olympic break and Gagner is still said to be on the block along with Ryan Smyth and Ales Hemsky. The Oilers could certainly market a few of their other young stars in hopes of shoring up their blueline, but their five-year rebuild will likely continue into yet another draft lottery where their number of top-3 selections will grow to four after winning the draft lottery three years in a row (2009-2012).

Losing John Tavares will likely ensure that the Islanders begin playing for 2015 as they’ll try to get a king’s ransom for Thomas Vanek and Andrew MacDonald as the two pending free agents will attract plenty of attention from teams battling for playoff positioning. Moving the two may also allow Garth Snow to protect his 2015 first round pick as Vanek and MacDonald could potentially net a first round pick each, giving Snow a security blanket, of sorts, for this year when he may need to give up his potential lottery pick to the Sabres as part of the Vanek/Moulson deal.

Buffalo is expected to be very busy as Miller, Moulson and Steve Ott are all expected to be moved and each has their own market value as the deadline approaches. A few teams are said to be interested in Miller, although the number who will likely make a legitimate offer won’t likely eclipse five. My gut tells me he ends up in Washington where George McPhee is on the hot seat and his team’s goaltending has kept them from playoff contention this year.

Ott and Moulson are said to have many more suitors and exactly where they end up is anyone’s guess. I wouldn’t be overly surprised to see Moulson end up in Ottawa where Tim Murray not only knows the prospect pool that he’d be gaining talent from, but his time with the organization may make negotiations go a bit quicker. Ott’s landing spot could be quite literally anywhere as his game can adapt to a number of different styles and any contender would be interested in adding an energy player like him. My money would be on a Western team, but that’s about as far as I would go in terms of guessing his destination.

It’s also rumored that Ryan Callahan will likely be skating in a new city after the deadline and he’d also add the two way element that so many teams find valuable. While trading Callahan may be expected, I’m fully expecting to see at least one big trade that catches everyone off guard. It could be something similar to the Marian Gaborik trade last year that saw a host of players swapped between New York and Columbus. Regardless of who is moved, count on at least one of those to catch you off guard before the day is out on the 5th. Also keep an eye on the trade wire in the days leading up to the deadline as a few moves could easily come prior to next Wednesday.

Tips for picking out goalie sticks

Tips for picking out goalie sticks

Tips for picking out goalie sticks

Not that long ago Bauer introduced the Vapor XXX composite goal stick to the market and forever changed the landscape of that particular niche of goaltending equipment.

While a few other entries served as a precursor to the Vapor, there wasn’t much out there in terms of a non-wood goal stick to purchase and use for goalies of any age. Today the goalie stick market is nearly flipped 180 degrees.

Each and every equipment manufacturer in the stick business has at least one line of full composite sticks to complement their traditional wood models. Some companies offer a number of lines that actually outnumber the traditionally built models they offer (Bauer).

When it comes to goal stick shopping, a few things need to be considered. The most important of which is durability and price point. While no two sticks are built the same, knowing that the one that works best for you is going to last longer than a few practices is vitally important.

Other factors that come into play are balance, weight, pattern and feel. With a plethora of composite sticks to consider when sorting through the stick rack, those factors become that much more important.

In my time playing net I’ve used a composite only a handful of times. Not once did I feel that I enjoyed the experience. Short of using the highest price point models, I found that the sticks I tried out were no lighter than the wood stick I have used my whole life, their responsiveness was anything but and the smooth composite finish was slippery to the touch.

That last point is an easy fix, of course. A little tape where the shaft and paddle meet will provide a tacky finish and even today nearly every model has some sort of grip applied to that area. Yet, the difference in feel between a wood and composite stick can be difficult to get past.

Keep in mind that I prefer to keep the shaft of my stick devoid of tape so that my hands can move up and down freely with just a good, solid knob at the very end to provide control with poke checks and puck handling. Many other goalies – like Ryan Miller – prefer some sort of homemade grip area where the shaft and paddle meet and the built-in grip that many composites have can eliminate the need to waste any more tape.

Another thing that helps with is vibrations caused by stopping pucks. Wood sticks, for the most part, pretty much absorb all vibrations caused by shots. But composites can suffer from something similar to a baseball bat with vibrations from a shot running up through the stick and into your hands. However, that’s something that is becoming less of an issue.

Advances in stick technology has provided a significant edge in many of the shortcomings composite sticks suffered from in the past. Most composites have shed weight in recent years and even the lower price point models are significantly lighter than the war clubs that preceded them. Yet, unless you’re aiming for the stars and the pro models, the weight savings aren’t all that much more than you find with pro model wood sticks.

The one primary advantage that I’ve found composites have over wood sticks is in durability. While you can certainly get a bad twig that breaks after 20 minutes of ice time, nearly every composite model out there will offer a longer life than wood sticks. While composites can snap at any moment, the well built ones don’t slowly deteriorate like a wood stick.

Wood sticks absorb water and will soften over time. As the blade of a stick deadens with age, rebound control will change and your puck handling (specifically passing) will suffer. Since a composite won’t suffer that sort of deterioration, you can count on them to give you a longer effective life after purchase.

Any sort of debate of wood vs. composite ultimately comes down to personal preference. There are plenty of guys and girls out there who swear by their composite sticks and won’t ever go back to a wood model. But then there are people like myself who prefer the feel you get with a wood stick and won’t change their tune.

A few other things to consider when planning on purchasing a stick:

– In many case weight and balance are more important than the curve or paddle length. If you’re able to easily move with the stick in hand and make normal goaltender moves, then that’s the stick for you. Just because you see NHL goalies using 27” paddles or big curves, doesn’t mean that is the type of stick you should use.

– Don’t buy a stick that you’ll need to cut down. Ideally a goalie stick is going to be just right for you when you purchase it. It doesn’t need to come to your chin or neck like a forward stick. Goal sticks are built with a specific balance point that will be altered if a portion of the shaft is cut down. Find a stick that fits you right, not one that needs to be altered.

– Buy at least two sticks at a time. The worst thing you can do is use two different sticks with drastically different patterns. When you find a curve and paddle length that you play best with, don’t mess around too much with it. Buy a second stick as a backup or practice stick and move forward with a unified arsenal of goal sticks.

– Try to use the more beaten up of your two sticks as your practice or warm up stick. If you have two identical sticks and one is more beaten up than the other, use that well worn stick for practice and warm ups. That will increase the longevity of your game stick and allow you to perform at a higher level.

Murray’s track record shows a strong hire for the Sabres front office

The Buffalo Sabres press conference introducing Tim Murray & Craig Patrick

The Buffalo Sabres press conference introducing Tim Murray & Craig Patrick

With Tim Murray named the new General Manager for the Sabres, the front office makeover has been completed nearly two months after it began with the introduction of Ted Nolan and Pat LaFontaine.

LaFontaine’s extensive search for a GM ran through a gamut of candidates before landing on Murray, who served as Ottawa’s Assistant General Manager prior to this appointment. While the process took far longer than expected or desired for many (including myself) it would appear that LaFontaine exhausted all options and vetted every candidate on his list to the fullest extent. While the original timeline was expected to only be a few weeks, I give credit to LaFontaine for conducting the search properly. If it indicates the type of work ethic LaFontaine will put into his position, I’m confident that the Sabres will be in good hands with him at the hockey department’s helm.

Murray also seems like a strong pick despite the early clubhouse leaders being names like Jason Botterill and Paul Fenton. A vast majority of Murray’s tenure in the NHL has seen him at the reigns of amateur talent evaluation and draft operations. He was part of a management team that scouted and drafted players like Joffery Lupul, Ryan Getzlaf, Corey Perry and Bobby Ryan in Anaheim before working with his uncle in Ottawa to draft players like Erik Karlsson, Jared Cowen, Jakub Silfverberg, Robin Lehner and others. One interesting thing I found when perusing the drafts of team’s he’s been with is that he’s had varying success in the middle rounds (like most GMs) and the Ducks swung and missed on back-to-back first round selections after Murray’s departure.

Pierre LeBrun has pointed out that Murray’s talent lies in talent evaluation and it would appear that his talents are particularly effective with younger players as his duties as Binghamton’s GM helped the Baby Sens win a Calder Cup just three years ago. Given the scores of picks and prospects the Sabres own, Murray appears to be a strong fit for guiding the Sabres through their rebuild.

Murray’s tenure as Buffalo’s General Manager begins at an interesting time, with the Olympics just a month away and just two months out from the trade deadline. Murray will need time to evaluate the organization, evaluate the talent depth from the junior level up through the AHL and then determining what assets he already has in the NHL as well.

It’s likely a tricky situation to find himself in as he’ll likely want at least a month to go through his own organizational evaluation before being in a situation to make any necessary decisions towards the future of the team’s future. That includes trading or re-signing Ryan Miller, Matt Moulson and Steve Ott among other decisions that will need to be made prior to the deadline.

I’m expecting a quiet January from Murray as he figures out exactly what he has in the NHL and AHL while also assessing the direction the team will be heading in the offseason. The Olympic break will prevent him from making any moves prior to the deadline, but it will also allow him an extra month to take a look at his prospects in junior and Rochester prior to the NHL getting back up to speed leading up to the trade deadline. The only real question mark about Murray is the role that he played in the trades made by the Senators in recent years and if he’ll be a strong presence at the trade tables when it comes time to negotiate for the Sabres.

Don’t expect to see any fireworks from Murray in the short term as I would expect and adept talent manager – as Murray is said to be – to take their time determining the strengths and weaknesses of their organizational depth. Certainly there will be fans who expect him to wheel and deal from the minute he settles into his new office, but that seems wildly unrealistic.

He’s going to be tasked with determining the solution to the Ryan Miller saga and he’ll likely be judged on that in the short term, particularly if Miller leaves for greener pastures. While the route he takes with Miller will likely shape his legacy, his actual effectiveness won’t be determined for at least two or three years as how he drafts might wind up being the most vital trait he brings to Buffalo.

While it’s important to get first overall selections and land generational talents, it’s equally important to have a GM who is capable of guiding the ship in the right direction. Murray’s knack for talent evaluation and strong drafting says a lot about his pedigree.

I’m certainly confident in the choice the LaFontaine and the Sabres have made with Murray and although it may be some time before he makes a significant move, I’m looking forward to seeing how Murray operates at the helm.

Bauer OD1N Ice Hockey Gear

Bauer OD1N Hockey Gear

Bauer OD1N Hockey Gear

Never before has there been a public display of the technological capabilities of a hockey company like Bauer displayed on December 19.

Bauer unveiled the OD1N equipment line that is going to officially be put on display during the 2014 Winter Olympics by some of the world’s best players. Nicklas Backstrom, Claude Giroux, Patrick Kane, Henrik Lundqvist and Jonathan Toews will each wear the OD1N gear during the games in a public display of Bauer’s technological prowess.

The line of thinking in developing the OD1N line was inspired by the concept cars introduced at auto shows on a yearly basis. Just as a concept car shows the features a car company hopes to bring to market in coming years, Bauer is using OD1N to introduce technological advances they hope to bring to market in the coming years.

That’s the most interesting part of this entire line of equipment. There’s a chance that none of this gear ever goes on sale to the general public. For now, it will just be for the world’s elite.

It’s more than likely that some of the features begin to be seen in stores sooner rather than later. But some of the design features in the line seem to be something that will only ever be found in an NHL locker room.

For example, the OD1N protective gear is mapped to each player’s body using a special scanning suit and a 3D scanning tool. It provides for a fully accurate, 3D map of each player’s body which then allows Bauer to build each shoulder pad, elbow pad and shin pad to the exact measurements of each player’s body.

Bauer also developed a base layer that has high-tech foam reinforcing specific areas throughout the body. For example, the small of the back or the neck. By putting this foam on the player’s base layer, the shoulder, elbow and shin pads can have foam and plastic removed since the base layer is already providing that protection.

The though process is to eliminate redundancies in each piece of equipment to ultimately save weight between the shoulders and legs. Ultimately, Bauer eliminated four pounds of weight by combining high-tech foam and carbon along with the scaled back layers of foam.

By eliminating that much weight, Bauer has determined that this equipment will make a player a full foot faster than a competitor in a 50-sprint. That means someone wearing this gear could conceivably beat an opponent to a puck by a full foot. Which is a significant difference.

Weight reduction is the key to the entire line of equipment as the inspiration is that those four missing pounds translated over each and every shift over the course of the game equates to hundreds of pounds of weight savings that was previously sitting on the shoulders and legs of each player. Therefore, by saving each player that much weight, Bauer expects each player to not only be more explosive shift-to-shift, but have more endurance at the end of each game as the stress exerted by their bodies will be that much less.

This is reflected in the radical new OD1N skate in the form of a brand new carbon-composite blade holder that doesn’t conform to any traditional design standards. Instead of a hole in the middle of the foot, the OD1N has two large holes below the toes and heel with a small, rigid stabilizer in the middle.

Combined with the high-tech carbon boot, Bauer has managed to save a full half-pound in each skate with the new design. They equate that to over 1000 pounds of weight that doesn’t need to be lifted over the course of an entire game.

They didn’t forget about the goaltenders either. Bauer’s OD1N goal pad is 1/3 the weight of a traditional goal pad which is a drastic difference in weight which, like with the skate and protective gear, is built to take away hundreds of pounds worth of lifting that is typically done by a goalie in a game.

Bauer also claims that the OD1N pad can be tuned to the specific rebound control preferences of each goalie. That caught me by surprise because the build of the pad has only so many layers of foam (due to weight savings) that there are only so many spots where some sort of change could be made.

What is interesting to me, about this whole line, is the fact that there is no indication that any of this will ever be on the shelves in any store. Clearly the build of the skate and the weight reduction in the goal pads can be easily introduced to a retail model. However, the fine-tuned carbon-composite blade holder (which is said to only hold a certain number of sharpenings in each blade) may never see the light of day. The same could be said of the 3D mapping of the protective gear. However, selling the protective equipment in unison with the base layer would allow anyone to benefit from the weight and design features of the equipment.

Regardless if this equipment is five months or five years away from hitting the shelves, it will be cool to see Henrik Lundqvist in a funky new set of pads and the stars of Team Canada, Russia, Sweden and USA sporting some very interesting, new equipment.

What They’re Wearing: Alex Ovechkin

What They’re Wearing: Alex Ovechkin

What They’re Wearing: Alex Ovechkin

Alex Ovechkin is one of the most electric playmakers in the NHL today. He’s perhaps the most pure goal scorer amongst the league’s elite and he is one of the few players that opponents need to keep an eye on at all times when he’s on the ice.

He’s also a player who is very focused on his gear. During the Capitals’ appearance on 24/7 he was one of the most excited players when their new equipment arrived ahead of the Winter Classic. He’s also gone through a major overhaul after he switched from CCM to Bauer a few years ago.

Helmet: Bauer RE-AKT helmet: Ovechkin wears the flagship helmet from Bauer along with a Bauer HDO Pro Straight Visor. His history of wearing a smoked or tinted visor added to his legend in a way given the unique look that he sported throughout his early career. The RE-AKT is a great helmet for a player like Ovechkin who has shown that he doesn’t shy away from contact and having a lid with Bauer’s Suspend-Tech padding liner will aid in lessening impacts taken when Ovechkin is giving or taking checks.

Stick: Bauer TotalOne NXG: Ovechkin’s banana-hook curve has gained almost cult status as the curve on his stick is beyond that of what any other pro uses these days. The TotalOne NXG suits Ovechkin’s game well as the lightweight, responsive stick is also quite tough. For a player that takes as many slap shots and one-timers as Ovechkin, a more durable model stick is exactly what’s needed.

Gloves: Bauer APX Pro: Interestingly, the TotalOne is the only piece of equipment that Ovechkin uses that doesn’t fall in line with the rest of his gear. Between his APX gloves and skates, it seems clear that Ovechkin prefers the speed and quickness promoted by that line of gear. The APX Pro gloves are no exception. Their tapered fit promotes a snug, responsive feel for the player, allowing the most adept stick handlers and shooters a glove that moves along with them at all times.

Skates: APX 2: A ridiculously lightweight skate, perfect for powerful skaters like Ovechkin. The stunning weight of the overall package leaves you feeling barely anything on your foot while you play. The APX 2 utilizes the new Lightspeed 2 TUUK that promotes a tighter turning radius due to a slightly higher angle thanks to the new holder. These are a perfect skate for Ovechkin as he’s consistently playing with the puck on his stick; and for a player who steams up the wing before making split-second changes in direction, a skate like this suits his game perfectly.

Set yourself apart with vintage inspired gear

Bauer Vintage TotalONE NXG Composite Hockey Stick

Set yourself apart with vintage inspired gear

As the holiday season approaches, as does the time for the NHL to take their game outdoors. That means all sorts of new uniforms are to be worn by the participating teams. Quite often those new uniforms are of the vintage variety and that vintage look is something that serves to be quite popular amongst fans.

Unfortunately, most players are unable to snag a pair of gloves or some of the other special edition equipment worn by the players and goalies during the Winter or Heritage Classic. Unless you’re willing to shell out major dough on eBay for game worn items, players are typically stuck enjoying the unique gear on television. But that’s no longer the case.

Great Skate is carrying a handful of special edition items this season that offer you an exclusive product much like what will be seen on the ice during the NHL’s outdoor games.

Bauer is offering two separate models of their Supreme TotalOne NXG stick in a vintage finish that’s quite reminiscent of a traditional wood stick. The primary finish is a natural or “vintage white” base with a very traditionally inspired graphic to finish the look. The sticks come in either a blue and red or black and red pattern, with the black and red being ever so slightly more modern due to the lack of the natural finish from the hosel up towards the middle of the stick.

The Vintage TotalOne NXG shares all of the features and benefits of the basic NXG with three different curve patterns available. The blue and red looks particularly good as the vintage white finish really makes the stick pop with the traditional design.

To complement the traditional NXG, Great Skate is also offering a unique, limited edition Warrior Bonafide X glove in a Winter Classic inspired design for Detroit and Toronto’s appearance in the Winter Classic this season.

Warrior Bonafide X Vintage Winter Classic Hockey Gloves

Warrior Bonafide X Vintage Winter Classic Hockey Gloves

The glove is a basic Bonafide X four-roll build with nothing but nylon as the outer finish. It has the look and feel of a pro glove and the addition of the lightweight nylon adds to that. Both the Toronto and Detroit color ways are just a basic blue and red, respectively. There are no additional stripes or graphics to dress these gloves up. Only the white (vintage white for the Detroit gloves) Warrior logo on the cuff and a custom Detroit and Toronto inscription where a player’s name would go on a pro model.

The Bonafide glove is a great model that shares a number of traits with Warrior’s flagship, the Franchise. It’s a popular model due to the responsiveness and pro look that appeals to a number of players. Adding the basic, vintage look to this popular model makes the Winter Classic Limited Edition gloves that much more of a hot ticket.

Pairing the Bonafide X Winter Classic gloves with one of Bauer’s TotalOne NXG Vintage sticks would give you a great, throwback inspired set up for this season.

Holiday Gift Guide for skaters

Bauer Vapor APX Mini Stick

Manufacturers bring top-end sticks to childhood favorite

With the holiday season upon us, hockey players are going to be filling their lists with all sorts of gift ideas. Some may be in need of an upgrade of a certain piece of equipment while others may be hoping to get the newest technology in their hands.

As you prepare to begin your shopping this year, keep some of these ideas in mind for the hockey players on your list:

Sticks: There are some awesome deals on sticks out there currently along with some very cool new technology that has really set a number of manufacturers apart from the others. One very cool idea, especially for the holidays is the MyBauer program. It is a feature that Bauer offers which will allow you to fully customize a stick just like the pros do. From flex and pattern right down to your own name and number, it is a very cool, personal gift idea. The new Easton VSeries is a brand new line from Easton with some incredible features and a lightweight profile across the entire line. The V5E comes at a great price point and offers many of the benefits that the VSeries has introduced. There are also a ton of great deals on Warrior’s full collection, including the Dynasty AX3. The Dynasty line is a tremendous collection with some groundbreaking technology from a company that is making huge strides with their impressive stick technology.

Gloves: Of all the gloves on the shelves nowadays, there isn’t anything cooler than the exclusive Warrior Bonafide Winter Classic gloves. These are a special edition glove designed by Warrior to compliment the uniforms that will be worn by Detroit and Toronto in this year’s Winter Classic. Both gloves come in 13 and 14-inch models and are very basic, but classic in their look. These will be huge favorites this winter. The Warrior Covert DT2 gloves also slot in at a phenomenal price point along with the incredibly comfy CCM CL400 gloves. If you’re looking for more color options than Toronto or Detroit, those two models would be a great place to start.

One last piece to keep in mind is the Youth Hockey Package. If a family member is hoping to, or has already started playing hockey, this is a wonderful gift to give. It features every piece of equipment that you need to get started; including a helmet, pants, shoulder pads, skates, gloves, shin guards and elbow pads. All that’s needed is a stick, a skater and a rink and your new player is good to go.

Stocking Stuffers: Laces, tape and hockey apparel are always welcome presents for hockey players of all ages.

Headshots dominate early NHL headlines

Headshots dominate early NHL headlines

Headshots dominate early NHL headlines

A rash of suspensions handed down from the NHL’s Department of Player Safety in a response to a ridiculous number of illegal checks through the first month of the NHL season has been the primary focus of fans and media members alike.

John Scott’s elbow to Louis Ericsson’s head was the exclamation point on a two-week span that saw a handful of ugly hits and somewhat lengthy suspensions doled out as punishment  joined Pat Kaleta as the sole set of teammates on the list of suspended players and the combined games between the two illustrates the need for more strict policing both on and off the ice.

The worst side effect from these hits – outside of the media circus they often spark – is the long-term effects that players will suffer from repeated head injuries. With all the steps the NHL has taken in an attempt to curb head contact and dangerous concussions, it’s hard to say what type of effect the recent legislation has had.

Companies like Bauer, CCM, Easton and Warrior who each have a major claim in the helmet market have each taken strides to introduce technologically advanced helmets with features designed to help reduce the chances that a concussion will occur. The Bauer RE-AKT is the current trail blazer in this category as the Suspend-Tech liner introduces a padded liner designed to move independently from the helmet shell; thus limiting the chances that a jarring blow to the shell will cause the head and brain to react in a similar manner.

Interestingly enough, one of the most effective helmet designs with concussion prevention in mind was the M11 helmet that was on the market recently. Bauer has taken over the line and is utilizing the Seven technology in their new IMS line.

However, in the NHL at least, these technologically advanced helmets aren’t the norm. Many professionals choose to go the comfortable route with a VN Foam liner in their helmet. That isn’t to say that a player’s choice in helmets has anything to do with keeping them free from concussions, but the use of old technology can’t be helping, either.

Football and hockey have both shown that no matter what type of helmet you’re using that jarring collisions that cause the head to be shaken or rattled in a violent matter will likely lead to some concussion-like symptoms. Even on plays without head contact, violently altering a body’s motion has the ability to cause a concussion due to the whiplash effect.

Preventing head injuries is ultimately on the onus of the players. At the youth and professional levels, the responsibility falls on the participants to avoid dangerous hits, slow down when they see their opponents numbers and be smart when lowering a hit.

Not one of the hits that led to a suspension in the NHL this year showed any sort of caution or care for the opponent. In a sport as physical and competitive as hockey this isn’t necessarily a surprise. However, the reckless actions that were taken by John Scott, Cody McLeod and Maxim Lapierre could have been easily prevented had the player processed what they were doing prior to leading with their elbow or throwing their opponent into the boards head first.

Goons, enforcers and grinders aren’t the lone culprits here either. Skill players who get away with taking liberties due to their status is a trend that cannot continue. While the physical force of the game isn’t likely to be drastically changed anytime soon, longer suspensions for violators in these cases will continue to serve as the deterrent for these plays.