25% off all Hockey Gear (13-Hour) Black Friday Sale

25% off all Hockey Gear (13-Hour) Black Friday Sale

25% off all Hockey Gear (13-Hour) Black Friday Sale

Starting on Friday November 29, 2013 for 13-hours, receive 25% off your purchase at both Great Skate and Greatskate.com. If you are going to be shopping online you can take advantage of early shopping and In-Store pickup. When shopping online please use Promotional Code GS2013 (Please note that your discount will be deducted at the time of shipping)

Great Skate will be opening a bit early on Friday morning starting at 8am, so if you or someone you know is out shopping at Best Buy, Target, and Kohl’s tell them to stop by and check out our great deals. Choose from all major manufacturers such as Bauer, CCM, Easton, Reebok, Warrior, & Vaughn. If a Bauer APX stick is on your list this year you won’t find a better deal than at Great Skate!

Don’t forget to ask about our door buster deals such as 50% off Bauer TotalONE Colored LE Composite Sticks, Easton Mako, & Easton Stealth RS II Sticks. How can you beat these deals? 

When it comes down to Fit, Feel, Performance, Dedication look no further than Great Skate. Stop by Friday morning at 3395 Sheridan Drive / Amherst / NY / 14226. If you aren’t from WNY give us a call at 1-800-828-7496. As always some restrictions may apply (MAP) click here or call for details.

Take advantage of this sale today. It wont last long. GAME ON!

Happy Thanksgiving

 

Great Skate Staff

What They’re Wearing: Ryan Miller

What They’re Wearing: Ryan Miller

What They’re Wearing: Ryan Miller of the Buffalo Sabres

There is going to be a big spotlight on Ryan Miller for most of the 2013-14 season. As he enters the final year of his contract with the Sabres many are wondering whether he will be convinced to re-sign, if he will be traded at the deadline or if he’ll simply play out the deal and sign with a new team in free agency.

While there will be plenty of talk about his play in Buffalo, one thing you may or may not have noticed is that he has completely switched his gear. After a number of years using Reebok equipment, Miller has gone to a Vaughn set up for the 2013-14 season.

Perhaps he is thinking of switching things up after a couple of playoff-less seasons in Buffalo. Maybe Vaughn was able to better construct the type of pad he wanted to wear moving forward. It’s anyone’s guess and here’s a look at what Miller is wearing this season.

Mask: Warwick custom – Dating back to his time at Michigan State (and probably earlier), Miller has worn a custom Warwick mask. It’s a small custom mask shop that primarily builds for pros and college players. But they have recently started doing work for Vaughn. Look for some of their design features in the new Vaughn mask line.

Blocker: CCM EFlex (blocker) and Vaughn T5500 (glove) – Ryan Miller broke his thumb during the 2005-06 season and subsequently switched to a Reebok (then RBK) blocker. The Lefevre design has a one-piece cuff that offers  comfortable, full-coverage protection that many other models don’t feature. Miller may actually be wearing the Vintage version of the EFlex, but the lack of graphics makes it hard to tell. I feel like it has become something of a comfort level with Miller as he’s worn a different model blocker (don’t be fooled by graphics) than his catch glove and pads since that 05-06 season. Miller’s new glove appears to be a T5500 model from Vaughn. Miller is known to be particular about his gear and it’s certainly possible that this is more of a custom build than what you’d find with a stock 5500. What’s for sure is the two-piece cuff and T-pocket appears to have all the qualities of the 5500.

Pads: Vaughn Velocity V5 – The most obvious change for Miller comes with his leg pads. Not only the manufacturer but that fact that his new Vaughn pads appear to be relatively stock. One thing many people didn’t know is that Miller’s Reebok Larceny’s were a fully custom pad that was built with the Larceny graphic. His previous pads were actually a custom build with traits from different Vaughn and CCM pads from previous years. These new pads have a flat face (as opposed to having shin rolls) and a more modern build than the traditional construction of his previous pads.

Stick: Reebok Pro – Miller has stuck with his sticks from previous seasons. The sturdy Reebok Pro wood stick. This is a solid stick that is popular throughout the league. I doubt he switches things up this year from a model that he’s been using for so long.

Exciting time for hockey in Buffalo as HARBORcenter rises

Exciting time for hockey in Buffalo as HARBORcenter rises

Exciting time for hockey in Buffalo as HARBORcenter rises

The cranes that dot the skyline in downtown Buffalo are feverishly assisting in assembling Terry Pegula’s newest piece of the growing Sabres campus at the foot of Washington Street. HARBORcenter is rising higher by the day as the hotel, twin-rink and parking garage complex works towards the slated 2014 opening date.

HARBORcenter –  is set to welcome a Marriott branch to the hotel portion of the project – will also include a large parking facility that will serve the adjacent First Niagara Center, hotel and the pair of rinks which will sit on top of the parking structure. One of the two rinks will seat 1,800 people and it was just announced that it will serve as the home for the Canisius Golden Griffins hockey program.

With the Golden Griffins joining the Junior Sabres minor program, it will make HARBORcenter a mecca for hockey in downtown Buffalo. Don’t forget that since the facility will be joined to First Niagara Center, it will create the NHL’s first three-rink facility.

Perhaps the ultimate benefit of having a premier hockey venue in the heart of downtown won’t be felt, but I’m sure that it won’t take long for the benefits to reveal themselves. Not only will one of the top youth programs in the area be operating out of the building, Buffalo’s lone DI NCAA program will not be playing feet away from the NHL rink. If there was a better way to bring the focus of Western New York’s hockey community to this building I’d like to know how.

There’s certainly no guarantee that Canisius’ program will blossom uncontrollably due to their move, but the recruiting trail might be a bit easier when professional scouts will be a hop and a skip from every home game in a brand new, state-of-the-art arena that is set to feature a training center specifically designed to develop hockey players.

I’m hopeful that the Griffs will be able to lure a few more premier names to their home for inter-conference matchups now that they’re no longer borrowing home ice at a different facility. Perhaps a certain blue and white clad team from Pennsylvania will want to check out the digs funded by the very man who provided funding for their new home.

Another benefit that will surely be on the table thanks to HARBORcenter will be the ability to lure national tournaments to Buffalo’s doorstep. This includes the Frozen Four. Buffalo first hosted the tournament in 2001 and have since (slowly) built out the waterfront while hitting the fast track with a premier hockey venue which will not just serve as a practice facility for the teams being hosted but also has a hotel to house each of the competing teams. Not to mention the additional development that is sure to impress the visiting guests from across the country.

Despite the fact that his professional team is beginning the difficult process of a rebuild, the construction happening outside of the First Niagara Center should bring attention to the arena for years to come.

What They’re Wearing: Cory Schneider

What They’re Wearing: Cory Schneider

What They’re Wearing: Cory Schneider

One of the best parts of the start of a new hockey season is all of the new goalie equipment that gets broken in during training camp and into the start of the season. New mask paint, pads and the like makes the first few weeks of the season fun.

While we are still a few weeks away from seeing all the new gear that goalies will be wearing, I wanted to take the chance to evaluate the gear worn by New Jersey’s newest netminder, Cory Schneider.

Mask: Bauer 961 – This is a classic throughout the NHL. It is a lightweight mask that offers great protection. It also has the iconic shape of Bauer’s design team that is reflected in products like the NME mask series.

Blocker & Glove: CCM E-Flex – CCM’s newest model that debuted this season. Designed by Lefevbre – the same guy who designs the Reebok line – the E-Flex is a great looking set that incorporates a number of design standards that have made Lefevbre designed equipment so popular over the years. Schneider specifically uses the one-piece cuff on the E-Flex catch glove as can be seen in this photo.

Pads: Vaughn Velocity V5: Schneider, like myself, is a fan of a softer, flexible pad. One of the few goalies in the league to use a double break on the outer roll of his pad, Schneider has what looks to be a very traditional set up for his leg pads (and his glove set too). While many NHL goalies use a number of special customizations on their pads, there doesn’t seem to be many on Schneider’s set. One interesting thing about his choice of an all-white design is he had been using a really cool color scheme earlier in the year before switching.

Stick: Warrior Swagger: Just a traditional white-based Swagger for Schneider. I’d personally would go blue with green trim if he’s keeping his pads all white, but that’s just my personal preference.

Skates: It is very hard to tell from the picture available on the web, but it would appear that Schneider is using one of the high-end models from Bauer. I’d venture a guess that they’re TotalOne skates or something similar based on the cowling and look of the boot. Leave a thought in the comments section if you have more information on this.

If you have a candidate for What They’re Wearing, please contact us on @greatskateblog or leave your recommendation in the comment section.

Beat the dog days with the Great Skate Summer Sale

Great Skate 30th Annual Summer Sale

Great Skate 30th Annual Summer Sale August 1st – 10th, 2013

As the summer days roll along and the temperatures continue to rise, there’s one event on the horizon that will have you thinking of cold, wintry weather in no time.

The 30th annual Great Skate Summer Sale is kicking off on August 1 and will continue through to August 10. The sale is available online, at greatskate.com and at our Buffalo, NY store. In addition to phenomenal deals on this year’s best equipment, you will have the opportunity to demo hockey’s newest releases and take part in a number of exciting giveaways and promotions.

Bauer, CCM, Easton, Reebok and Warrior will each be participating in demo days between August 5 and 9 that will feature each manufacturer’s newest sticks and equipment. Players will have the opportunity to demo the newest sticks which will be hitting the market along with trying on each company’s newest gear between 10am and 6pm each day that the demos take place.

Along with providing a unique demo of their newest equipment and sticks, Easton will also be providing an opportunity for a team to win a full set (18) of Easton composite sticks for the season. All you need to do is provide your full team roster to enter the drawing for the team set.

Bauer is getting in on the fun as well, offering a week’s worth of prizes that run from Monday through Friday and include a Ryan Keseler James VanRiemsdyk and Patrick Kane sticks, a new pair of Vapor APX skates and Friday’s grand prize of Bauer sticks for a year.

The Summer Sale will also feature one of the newest Buffalo Sabres as Buffalo’s own Justin Bailey will be on hand from 5pm to 6pm on August 1. You will have a chance to test your shot against Bailey and see how you stack up against an NHL draft pick.

Bailey won’t be the only competition Summer Sale guests will have for shooting. Warrior is sponsoring the Warrior Hockey Chara Challenge which will be a fastest shot competition with giveaways that include Warrior merchandise and a Dynasty AX1 stick.

In addition to the Chara Challenge, Warrior will be providing one lucky winner with two tickets to the 2014 Winter Classic at the Big House in Ann Arbor, Michigan with $200 spending money and one night’s hotel accommodations for the game.

Be sure not to miss your opportunity to take home any one of the terrific prizes that will be up for grabs while also taking advantage of all the phenomenal deals that will provide up to 80% savings on select items.

The 30th annual Great Skate Summer Sale kicks off on August 1, be sure you don’t to miss a minute.

In the Crease: What type of cage should I wear?

NHL goal mask rankings: The top ten

NHL goal mask rankings: The top ten

After I got out of school I eventually obtained an Itech (now Bauer) Profile mask. It happened to have a cat eye cage and it was the first mask I had ever used with that type of cage on it. However, that helmet has since been forced into retirement and I’m back in a helmet with a certified cage. While I’m considering fitting that helmet with a cat eye, I realize that many rec league goaltenders wear both certified and cat eye cages. The question is; which is the best?

Certified Cages

Certified cages are the norm in virtually every level of hockey. Only the professional leagues, NCAA and ACHA allow goaltenders to wear cat eye cages. So all goaltenders have worn a certified cage at some point in their lives.

Most basic certified cages have a grid pattern layout for the bars on the cage that are designed for maximum vision while also ensuring that sticks and pucks won’t find their way to the goalie’s face. Some companies also now make certified cat eye cages which have an additional bar that ensures that sticks and pucks won’t find their way in but while carrying the general look of a cateye cage. The one issue that I have with the certified cat eye cages is that each manufacturer uses different techniques to ensure their cage is up to par. Not only do they look awkward (mirror test) but they simply don’t perform the way you would expect from a normal cat eye.

Whether you’re sporting a certified cat eye or a traditional certified cage the common theme is that all certified models ensure maximum safety as no sticks or pucks can get through.

The main drawback with certified cages is that they have a number of additional bars that can obstruct your vision. Most are built in a way that any bars in your field of vision are blurred by your eye’s natural focusing mechanisms that they aren’t an issue. However, I can attest that you do notice those extra bars. Especially the ones in your peripheral vision.

Cat Eye Cages

Take a look at any NHL game and you’ll see the goalies wearing a cat eye cage. These are cages with a wide, elliptical gap that provides an unobstructed view of the game for the goalie. The structure of the cage is such that the bars are shaped to go around the goaltender’s field of vision as opposed to crossing directly over top of it. They also have a pretty attractive look to them as the sleek, curved bars leave more open space than the basic grid layout of a certified cage. The real benefit lies with the increased field of vision with this helmet. The wide opening provides you with a completely unobstructed view of the ice and even your peripherals are kept clear of most of the cage’s bars. It is definitely the better of the two choices when it comes to performance.

The only drawback with a cat eye cage is the fact that a stick can easily fit inside the mask and a puck can be forced through as well. I myself have been caught with a stick once by a passing player and the risks associated with these cages are very real.

Which to wear?

The determination that any goalie needs to make when choosing between a cat eye and certified cage is the performance vs. safety that each offers. If you’re comfortable wearing a cat eye cage despite the inherent risks then you should certainly do so. In addition, if you feel that a cat eye cage improves your play that much more, that’s probably the one to go with. However, if sticks to the eye aren’t something you care to deal with and the difference in vision is negligible, then a certified cage is probably the route you want to take.

At this point in time I don’t have much use for simply buying a cat eye cage. The certified cage on my current mask doesn’t bother me so much that I need to change it. However I can say with certainty that the next mask I purchase will have a cat eye cage.

Twenty years later the Bauer Reactor is back

Bauer Reactor 4000 Sr. Goalie Pads

Bauer Reactor 4000 Sr. Goalie Pads

Back in 1994 goaltenders wearing Bauer goal pads were all wearing the Reactor line. Big names like Dominik Hasek and Mike Richter were sporting the equipment and leading the NHL in the gear. 20 years later Bauer has come back to the Reactor.

Serving as an extension and evolution of the Reflex line of goal pads that was developed when Bauer and Itech merged, the Reactor is a pro-style butterfly pad that is specifically designed for a hybrid style of play. Unlike the Supreme TotalOne line which is a true butterfly style, flat-faced pad, the Reactor is more of a hybrid style pad. Bauer even gave the style associated with the Reactor a buzzword in their 2013 catalog: Battlefly.

That seems like an appropriate way to describe the pad and the style of the goaltenders that would wear this type of pad. Just looking at some of the players around the league wearing them now (Brian Elliott and Ilya Bryzgalov), they employ a butterfly-first mentality but use various pieces of other styles in their repertoire.

These are flexible pads that introduce a triangle outer roll which puts a slight pitch on the outer roll of the pads. The 6000 Pro Custom pads also come stock with a double knee break but different break options are available on the pad.

Beyond the 6000 Pro model, the 4000 and 4000x offer top-end performance without needing a custom build. The 4000x actually utilized the myFlex feature that is prevalent throughout the TotalOne line. This is a piece of technology that allows the goaltender to determine what kind of flex option they wish to have on their pads.

The newest introduction to the Reactor line is the Pro Core insert. This serves as the “brain” of the pad that is designed to give a soft feel to the pad but maintaining the firmness needed to maintain a proper S-shape and limit the pad from breaking down over time. Combined with the triangle outer roll and the reintroduction of the Flexx Darts gives the Reactor pad a phenomenal blend of traditional construction that creates a flexible lightweight pad that is conducive to a number of different styles.

In terms of the eye test, the Reactor passes with flying colors. Bauer built off the Reflex pattern while extending the graphic upwards. This creates a dynamic, linear graphic that looks good in a number of styles.

Looking at the overall construction and appearance of the pad, this reminds me of what the Velocity was when it was first introduced. A soft, reactive pad that allows a goaltender to play a number of styles.

There are three models in the Reactor line; the 6000 Pro, 4000 and 2000. The 4000 and 2000 each have a senior model with the 2000 covering junior pads. The glove and blocker aren’t too far removed from the Reflex line in design and use. Both draw their lineage to the flexible leg pads by offering flexible cuff options that will react well when used with your chest & arm protector.

The catch glove is a single-T pocket construction with skate lace for the pocket lacing. Skate lace is more durable than regular twine lacing but can be more difficult to keep in shape. As for the blocker, the one piece thumb and outer hand protection really stands out. It is not obtrusive and has a good looking construction in terms of offer complete protection and coverage.

As someone who counts the original Reactor line amongst my favorite goal pads of all time, I’m glad to see this equipment make a comeback; particularly in a style that suits the kind of game I try to play.

NHL goal mask rankings: The top ten

NHL goal mask rankings: The top ten

NHL goal mask rankings: The top ten

After giving you the rundown of the rest of the league’s goal masks, I give you the best of the best. These are masks with varying levels of detail and uniqueness. Each of these stand out to me for a different reason and rank amongst my favorite in the entire league.

Share your thoughts on who has the league’s best mask in the comments.

10. Ryan Miller – Miller’s mask was getting stale until he updated last season. Adding the Buffalo script to the chin and the charging Buffalo to either side of the chin updated what is becoming a very iconic design. The question is, will you see this design in Buffalo next season?

9. Jhonas Enroth – His crease partner is just one spot below and I give Enroth the edge because of the clean lines and incorporation of a number of design features by his mask artist. Parts of this can get busy, but the longhorn skull has been a mainstay on many old Sabres helmets and the oversized logo gives the left side a clean, basic look.

8. Jimmy Howard – Racing stripes, 60s-era Mustangs and a very unique take on Detroit’s muscle car heritage give Howard a very cool design. I’m a big fan of this mask and the player who sports it.

7. Ray Emery – Emery’s mask manages to pay homage to Native American culture in a very classy way. I think his mask looks phenomenal and is easily interpreted at a distance and up close.

6. Miikka Kiprusoff – Kipper’s skulls are just about as iconic as Marty Broduer’s mask in many ways. This particular version really stood out to me when he unveiled it and I’m glad he’s still using it. I can find no flaws in the design and using the bolts as eyes on the chin skull is a great touch.

5. Jose Theodore – Theodore has always had masks that I’ve liked. For some reason this one is very appealing to me. I like the Tiki skull features that have been worked in and the white base makes the other colors pop. I think this plays so well on so many levels.

4. Jacob Markstrom – A slightly altered interpretation of one of hockey’s greatest goal masks of all time. Markstrom’s mask has a little more of the entire logo worked in, but it still has the same feel that Beezer’s mask did back it the 90s. A very well executed paint job.

3. Peter Budaj – Ned Flanders. Need I say more? Budaj manages to work in two very personal items (Flanders and Lionel Messi) into his mask while also keeping a clean look. I love the way this paint job works and that’s why it is in my top three.

2. Brian Elliott – Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles were a big part of my upbringing and it would appear the same is true of Brian Elliot. I love that he uses Casey Jones on his masks. They also manage to have a heavy team element too, which puts this high on my list.

1. Ondrej Pavelec – When I first did this list I wasn’t sure which mask was truly my favorite. I tossed around a few up near the top of the rankings but I settled on Pavelec for a few reasons. First; the fighter jet interpretation works incredibly well here (much better than Montoya’s). Second; every line is clean and although there is a lot going on, there is nothing that runs together. Third; This just has attitude to it. The fighter jet theme just works so well in this particular paint job and that’s why I have it as number one.

Vaughn takes a new direction with Ventus line

Vaughn takes a new direction with Ventus line

Vaughn takes a new direction with Ventus line

Vaughn has served as an industry leader in goal pad design and production for a long time. In fact, the Velocity line helped to revolutionize the position in the early 2000s when the butterfly style was enhanced with the Velocity’s ability to sit flush against the ice.

Since the Velocity was released goaltending manufacturers have engaged in an arms race to introduce new and revolutionary designs with each set of goal pads they build. All the while, Vaughn has played the role of the tortoise; slow and steady wins the race.

While the new Velocity 5 continues the tradition of the now legendary line, Vaughn has once again thrown their hat in the ring with a slightly different pad design. The Ventus goal pad is built with a closer resemblance to the thin, low-profile, flat-front pads that have been released by Bauer, Reebok, Warrior and other manufacturers in recent years. Vaughn offered a model a couple of years back that, while well received, didn’t have the same legs as the traditional Velocity line. However, the Ventus should change all of that.

While the Velocity line remains in it’s original form, the Ventus picks up where the reintroduced Vision line left off not more than a year ago.

The Ventus is a full flat-faced pad with a single-break outer roll designed to promote a solid, firm shape and construction. The overall construction is made to remain rigid even after being broken in so the gradual S-bend maintains its form at all times. Vaughn accomplishes this by utilizing a lightweight inner core with rigid properties to maintain a consistent pad shape. This is a pad construction that is gaining popularity throughout the NHL as goaltenders like Carey Price and Antti Niemi opt for longer, stiffer pads which maintain their shape at all times.

For those goaltenders – like myself – who prefer a more flexible bend towards the top of the pad, the Ventus does have a flexible knee option available.

The interior of the pad is not all that much different from the Velocity construction. The Ventus design provides a greater anatomical fit in various locations to promote greater contact with the ice, added extension in the butterfly and reduced stress to the knees and hips.

The landing gear at the knee and calf area are wide and provide ample coverage while dispersing direct impact. In addition, the calf wrap provides full wrap-around protection while also covering gaps by promoting flush contact when leaning against the posts. The knee and calf wrap system is designed to work in unison so that the goaltender receives improved responsiveness from the pad during games.

As for graphics, the Ventus looks good. The sleek vertical lines give the pads a tall presence in a similar fashion to the way that the Premier 4 graphic is designed. Vaughn’s graphics allow for up to five areas with different colors but work best with a three-color scheme.

If you’re a goaltender in the market for a flat-faced, low-profile pad, don’t rule out Vaughn as a candidate. The Ventus series is a strong entry into a corner of the market that has been previously controlled by a limited selection.

Late flurry defines 2013 deadline

Late flurry defines 2013 deadline

Late flurry defines 2013 deadline

If you were one of many hockey fans across North America glued to a TV set or phone waiting for trades
to break, today might have dragged. A flurry of action over the past five days dried up a significant
amount of the presumed trade targets entering the deadline. However, a few GMs managed to not
disappoint.

A handful of minor trades in the early afternoon did little to set the market before Tampa Bay sent Cory
Conacher and a draft pick to Ottawa in exchange for Ben Bishop. While this wouldn’t end up as one of
the day’s biggest trades it was significant enough to get the ball rolling.

The flurry of trades that came down prior to the 3:00 deadline were punctuated by deals that saw
established scorers Marian Gaborik and Jason Pominville moved along with a list of role and depth
acquisitions. What was most surprising was seeing the surging Columbus Blue Jackets come away as the
day’s most active team.

Columbus made four separate moves that included the day’s biggest blockbuster in which they acquired
sniper Marian Gaborik. The Jackets sent a handful of pieces to the Rangers in exchange for Gaborik in a
move that gives them a lethal weapon on the wing less than a year removed from trading Rick Nash to
the Rangers.

Columbus’ deal is the most earth shattering for a few reasons. First, Gaborik had been mentioned here
and there in rumors but wasn’t truly expected to move, especially compared to a player like Ryane
Clowe (who also ended up in New York). The second reason this is so surprising is that the Blue Jackets
entered the year with a new makeup after trading Nash and with every expectation to continue their
rebuild, their recent success turned them to a buyer and they went out and bought one of the most
expensive options on the market.

What shouldn’t be ignored with this deal is what the Rangers got in return. After not re-signing Brandon
Prust and trading two key depth forwards to Columbus in the Nash deal (Dubinsky and Anisimov) the
Blueshirts managed to gain a skilled depth forward (Derick Brassard) and a gritty winger (Derek Dorsett)
to go along with a late draft pick and a highly touted defensive prospect (John Moore). Add those three
to Clowe and the Rangers managed to get a little tougher despite losing a major offensive weapon.
While they gave up the most talent, they may not have lost the trade.

The next biggest deal of the day came out of Minnesota, where the Wild brought in a skilled scoring
winger in Jason Pominville. A solid two-way player, Pominville is effective in all situations (including the
PK) and is signed through next season at a relatively affordable $5.3M cap hit. Going back to Buffalo was
a plethora of pieces that includes two draft picks and two prospects.

The Wild get a lot more skill for their top six and Pominville should offer plenty of support to at roster
that already boasts Parise, Heatley, Koivu and PM Bouchard. The added bonus that Pominville doesn’t
hit free agency until next summer means that they can hopefully stretch this talent beyond this year’s

playoff push. Despite mortgaging quite a bit of talent, this was a strong move for the Wild as they look
to win now.

Buffalo is going all-in with their rebuilding mode, acquiring Johan Larsson and Matt Hackett with
Minnesota’s first round pick this year and a second round pick next year. The picks will be extremely
valuable for Darcy Regier as he holds 11 total picks in the first two rounds of the 2013, 2014 and 2015
drafts combined. Whether or not he uses those picks remains to be seen, but that is plenty of currency
for a GM who will most certainly be looking to wheel and deal in the offseason.

One interesting trade was the Bishop for Conacher deal. The Lightning spent a few assets to acquire
Anders Lindback over the summer before realizing that he may not be the answer long-term. All the
while, they went and gave the Senators an even better return for Bishop than what Ottawa paid for
him at least year’s deadline. While Steve Yzerman did good work to address his troubled goaltending
situation, he gave up quite a bit for two different pieces at the same position.

Meanwhile, Bryan Murray is probably laughing his way to the bank as he effectively traded a second
round pick for Cory Conacher and an additional fourth round pick. Conacher is going to have an impact
on the Senators roster for the foreseeable future (unless he regresses from this hot rookie year) all while
not costing Murray much of anything – as he still has Craig Anderson and Robin Lehner to protect the
net.

The majority of the major moves at this deadline came in the days prior to April 3. The acquistions of
Iginla, Morrow and Murray makes the Penguins the immediate winners based on their return and the
fact that they sacrificed very little to acquire those three players. Of course, if the Pens don’t hoist the
Cup, they won’t be the long-term winners of this deadline.

Still, Ray Shero put his team in the best position to succeed by acquiring the three players he did. While
his top defensive prospect and a first round pick went out the door, not all that much went along with it.
Credit is due to Shero for the way he maneuvered prior to the deadline and for the roster the Penguins
will enter the playoffs with.

Overall I’d have to say the Penguins come away as the big winner while the Rangers (surprised?) aren’t
far behind. If New York can get Clowe re-signed with the money they saved from Gaborik they will have
a bevvy of talented players to fill out the lines below the Nash-Richards power line.

I’m not sure if I can count the Bruins as winners for snagging Jaromir Jagr, but 68 should give Boston
a nice boost entering the playoffs. That type of savvy veteran can’t be overlooked on a team that is
already so incredibly talented.

If there are any losers at this deadline I’d be so bold to say that it is the Blues. While St. Louis did a great
job bringing in two solid veteran defensemen, they didn’t address their questionable goaltending (even
though they only allow 20 shots per game). While Leopold and Bouwmeester are great talents, the Blues
already boasted an impressive defensive corps. I wonder if these two trades will be enough to vault the
Blues into a playoff spot.

The one thing that does need to be remembered with the deadline is that you can’t truly declare a
winner until the Stanley Cup has been raised. In addition, many of these trades full value won’t be
realized until the draft picks have been used. When you take that into account, some of these moves
won’t have full value for at least two years. However, the Kings made some waves last year and went on
to win the Cup, with that in mind be sure to look back at what moves this year’s Cup winner made at the
deadline.