Category Archives: New Products

New Covert goes further undercover for Warrior

Warrior Covert DT1LT Senior Composite Hockey Stick - 85 Flex
Warrior Covert DT1LT Senior Composite Hockey Stick – 85 Flex

Plenty of players took the ice with Warrior’s Dagger Technology on the Covert line-up last season. Warrior’s elite model, the DT1 was one of the most popular sticks on the market last year.

The Covert is back for another run with new and improved technology geared to push it to the next level.

The DT1 LT and ST models are ready to find their way to stores, giving players a pair of options when it comes to picking a new stick for the upcoming season.

Both sticks utilize Dagger 2 Technology, which is designed to improve the revolutionary flex-improving technology that was a major part of the Covert’s success in 2012-13. The Dagger 2 further enhances the flex and kick point, providing more kick on shots. In addition, the twinspar technology that was built into Warrior’s blades last season have been extended up into the Dagger tip as an addition compliment to the Dagger 2 features.

The Twinspar EXT is similar, in a way, to the thinking behind the Reebok Ribcor technology. By strengthening the kick point of the stick, Twinspar EXT serves as an additional piece of stick technology that is included as a way to increase kick.

Specifically, the new DT1 line includes the LT and the ST models. The LT is built with features to lighten the shaft and blade in order to promote increased balance and better performance. On the other hand, the ST has a stronger, reinforced design that is perfectly designed for stronger players looking to put more behind their shots.

Other features that are back for 2013-14 are the carbon plated blade and Aramid sole which are both carry over features from previous models designed for durability and longevity of the product.  As someone who had the opportunity to see Warrior’s new technology at work with the Dynasty last season, I fully expect the new Covert line to surpass the innovations introduced last year.

Labatt Blue Wingman Tournament brings a new twist

Unfortunately the Labatt Blue Pond Hockey Tournament has encountered a few bumps in the road the last few years. Warm weather wiped the tournament in 2012 and the 2013 version was severely limited due to a host of twists thanks to Mother Nature.

Organizers have been putting their heads together and have cooked up what appears to be a “plan B” or “plan C” for the winter staple. Synthetic ice.

Eight teams will participate in a two-on-two tournament on a small, synthetic surface in the middle of the annual Wing Festival at Coca-Cola Field. The heat on August 31 isn’t going to be an issue as the synthetic surface appears to be immune to everything from sun to snow. I can only assume that synthetic surfaces will be kept on hand come winter time in the event that the weather doesn’t cooperate yet again.

I, for one, have never skated on a synthetic surface but I have to imagine there are some specific differences between that and traditional ice. What will be interesting to see is how the participants react to the playing surface as there seems to be a pretty good chance that the Basin Marina or man-made rinks are replaced by this in February.

Credit is due to those who realized the possibilities of this type of product. Given that the idea behind the tournament is to use the frozen Marina – despite weather constraints – a viable plan B will be needed on a yearly basis. Since ice will be tough to maintain on a man-made rink in the same weather that keeps the Marina from freezing, a non-ice based surface is what would be needed. It would appear that this is the best option until the canals are completed down at Canalside (although it would seem a new Peace Bridge may come sooner).

As someone who has signed up for pond hockey the last three years, it has been disappointing to see weather alter the event so badly. It is a great deal of fun and makes for an awesome setting when the stars align. If synthetic ice is the way to keep this moving forward until the refrigerated canals are ready, then so be it.

Hopefully the surface gets strong reviews on the 31 and the yearly tournament goes off without a hitch no matter how mild of a winter Buffalo has in 2013-14.

On the Ice: CCM RBZ skates

CCM RBZ Skate and RBZ Stage 2 Stick
CCM RBZ Skate and RBZ Stage 2 Stick

On the heels of their partnership with Taylor made to release the RBZ stick last season, CCM took a step forward in 2013 in not only revamping the RBZ stick, but introducing the RBZ skate to their line.

When I got around to getting the RBZ skates on the ice, it wasn’t the first time I had a chance to try a pair on. The CCM RBZ Demo Day afforded me a chance to take a spin in the new wheels and helped to inspire me to give the product a closer look.

Finer details of the skate’s design can be found in our product review posted earlier this summer.

Out of the Box

The RBZ is a very good looking skate. It’s a very basic, traditional look that goes light on accents and crazy desgins and heavy on dark colors. It is a nice way to disguise the all-carbon boot as the dark upper just looks like the outside of any old skate you’ve grown up wearing. Upon closer inspection, however, the details of the construction are more evident.

One difference with the RBZ over just about every skate on the market is how big they run. CCM constructed them to fit a little wider which practically sizes them up nearly one full size for most people. I’m anywhere between a 10 or 10.5 in skates and the RBZ I’m wearing are a 9.5. Keep that in mind when you go to try them on.

The wide fit is pretty much uniform through the entire skate and it isn’t reduced until they take a spin in the oven and get laced up the first time. This doesn’t mean that putting them on out of the box gives a deceptive feel, but allowing them to bake and mold will do wonders in the fit and comfort department.

Most other facets of the skate are relatively basic. There’s nothing that stands out in store or even in the locker room in terms of the feel or ascetics. The physical attributes of the skate are another story as the incredible weight savings CCM used are the first thing anyone notices when they hold the skate.

This balance and weight work that CCM put into the RBZ is noticeable on the ice as well, as the skates are barely noticeable at times.

On the Ice

One word of warning on the RBZ skate; wear them around your house a lot. My previous on ice review of the Easton Mako revealed a skate that was pretty much game ready after baking. The RBZ is close but does need a little extra wear before your first ice time. While I didn’t get a chance to break them in further at home, I only experience slight discomfort the first time I got them on the ice.

Another thing that stood out to me was the fit once I was ready to go. The wide fit caused me to lace my skates a little tighter than usual to ensure the fit I have grown accustomed to. However, once I got the skates to a point I liked it was smooth sailing.

Since I’m not an overly fast or quick player, nothing much improves those attributes of my game. Yet, the three games I’ve worn the RBZ for have been ice times in which my cornering and edge work have been improved. While only an ACME rocket would give me more straightaway speed, I feel that my edges and in-tight agility have improved with the skates.

There’s something about the RBZ that makes me feel incredibly comfortable on the ice. While the wide fit was something I had to adjust to, the comfort level of these skates is completely unparalleled. CCM has a full line of skates in the RBZ family and each and every one is worth a long look when you come in to grab a new pair.

Exciting time for hockey in Buffalo as HARBORcenter rises

Exciting time for hockey in Buffalo as HARBORcenter rises
Exciting time for hockey in Buffalo as HARBORcenter rises

The cranes that dot the skyline in downtown Buffalo are feverishly assisting in assembling Terry Pegula’s newest piece of the growing Sabres campus at the foot of Washington Street. HARBORcenter is rising higher by the day as the hotel, twin-rink and parking garage complex works towards the slated 2014 opening date.

HARBORcenter –  is set to welcome a Marriott branch to the hotel portion of the project – will also include a large parking facility that will serve the adjacent First Niagara Center, hotel and the pair of rinks which will sit on top of the parking structure. One of the two rinks will seat 1,800 people and it was just announced that it will serve as the home for the Canisius Golden Griffins hockey program.

With the Golden Griffins joining the Junior Sabres minor program, it will make HARBORcenter a mecca for hockey in downtown Buffalo. Don’t forget that since the facility will be joined to First Niagara Center, it will create the NHL’s first three-rink facility.

Perhaps the ultimate benefit of having a premier hockey venue in the heart of downtown won’t be felt, but I’m sure that it won’t take long for the benefits to reveal themselves. Not only will one of the top youth programs in the area be operating out of the building, Buffalo’s lone DI NCAA program will not be playing feet away from the NHL rink. If there was a better way to bring the focus of Western New York’s hockey community to this building I’d like to know how.

There’s certainly no guarantee that Canisius’ program will blossom uncontrollably due to their move, but the recruiting trail might be a bit easier when professional scouts will be a hop and a skip from every home game in a brand new, state-of-the-art arena that is set to feature a training center specifically designed to develop hockey players.

I’m hopeful that the Griffs will be able to lure a few more premier names to their home for inter-conference matchups now that they’re no longer borrowing home ice at a different facility. Perhaps a certain blue and white clad team from Pennsylvania will want to check out the digs funded by the very man who provided funding for their new home.

Another benefit that will surely be on the table thanks to HARBORcenter will be the ability to lure national tournaments to Buffalo’s doorstep. This includes the Frozen Four. Buffalo first hosted the tournament in 2001 and have since (slowly) built out the waterfront while hitting the fast track with a premier hockey venue which will not just serve as a practice facility for the teams being hosted but also has a hotel to house each of the competing teams. Not to mention the additional development that is sure to impress the visiting guests from across the country.

Despite the fact that his professional team is beginning the difficult process of a rebuild, the construction happening outside of the First Niagara Center should bring attention to the arena for years to come.

Beat the dog days with the Great Skate Summer Sale

Great Skate 30th Annual Summer Sale
Great Skate 30th Annual Summer Sale August 1st – 10th, 2013

As the summer days roll along and the temperatures continue to rise, there’s one event on the horizon that will have you thinking of cold, wintry weather in no time.

The 30th annual Great Skate Summer Sale is kicking off on August 1 and will continue through to August 10. The sale is available online, at greatskate.com and at our Buffalo, NY store. In addition to phenomenal deals on this year’s best equipment, you will have the opportunity to demo hockey’s newest releases and take part in a number of exciting giveaways and promotions.

Bauer, CCM, Easton, Reebok and Warrior will each be participating in demo days between August 5 and 9 that will feature each manufacturer’s newest sticks and equipment. Players will have the opportunity to demo the newest sticks which will be hitting the market along with trying on each company’s newest gear between 10am and 6pm each day that the demos take place.

Along with providing a unique demo of their newest equipment and sticks, Easton will also be providing an opportunity for a team to win a full set (18) of Easton composite sticks for the season. All you need to do is provide your full team roster to enter the drawing for the team set.

Bauer is getting in on the fun as well, offering a week’s worth of prizes that run from Monday through Friday and include a Ryan Keseler James VanRiemsdyk and Patrick Kane sticks, a new pair of Vapor APX skates and Friday’s grand prize of Bauer sticks for a year.

The Summer Sale will also feature one of the newest Buffalo Sabres as Buffalo’s own Justin Bailey will be on hand from 5pm to 6pm on August 1. You will have a chance to test your shot against Bailey and see how you stack up against an NHL draft pick.

Bailey won’t be the only competition Summer Sale guests will have for shooting. Warrior is sponsoring the Warrior Hockey Chara Challenge which will be a fastest shot competition with giveaways that include Warrior merchandise and a Dynasty AX1 stick.

In addition to the Chara Challenge, Warrior will be providing one lucky winner with two tickets to the 2014 Winter Classic at the Big House in Ann Arbor, Michigan with $200 spending money and one night’s hotel accommodations for the game.

Be sure not to miss your opportunity to take home any one of the terrific prizes that will be up for grabs while also taking advantage of all the phenomenal deals that will provide up to 80% savings on select items.

The 30th annual Great Skate Summer Sale kicks off on August 1, be sure you don’t to miss a minute.

CCM takes scoring to a new level with RBZ Stage 2 stick

CCM takes scoring to a new level with RBZ Stage 2 stick
CCM takes scoring to a new level with RBZ Stage 2 stick

Balance and power is the name of the game for the RBZ Stage 2 stick. After the wild success of the hot faced RBZ stick that rolled out last year, the great minds at CCM have found a way to take another step forward.

The RBZ Stage 2, due out in July, has taken CCM’s innovative stick and added even more pop. When I first picked up and used the original RBZ I noticed two things about it. First, the pop off the blade was noticeable. Second, the balance of the stick felt odd.

When you pull and RBZ off the rack at Great Skate you’ll notice that it is incredibly light but that it feels a little blade heavy. This was likely a product of the placement of the balance point that worked with the PowerSwing Technology that CCM and TaylorMade touted with the original stick. PowerSwing is straight from the golf club technology but it didn’t fully translate on the original. It does now, however.

The Stage 2 has an improved balance point to further exploit the Powerswing traits while also increasing the feel and balance of the stick exponentially. The Stage 2 is expected to have a much lighter feel in the blade.

In addition, the Stage 2 has a new blade construction. While CCM determined that the Speedblade was a great addition (it truly is), they wanted to improve upon it. What they did was take the original blade with four speed channels and adjust it to three larger speed channels. Not only does this alter the interior structure of the blade by decreasing weight, it increases the pop that the pucks comes off the stick with.

What they effectively did was make a light stick with a hot blade lighter and hotter. Based on the on-ice results, they hit a home run. The RBZ Stage 2 hits the shelves on July 19, make sure you’re first in line to Strap a Rocket to the Puck.

Warrior protective makes strides with new features

Warrior Dynasty AX1 Shoulder Pad
Warrior Dynasty AX1 Hockey Shoulder Pad

It’s been a while since I’ve been in the market for new protective gear – both in net or playing forward. On a recent trip to Great Skate I was trying on some different elbow pads an noticed one common theme; elbow pads have become incredibly bulky.

The whole host of offerings from Bauer down to Warrior just didn’t feel perfect on my arm. I noticed a relatively similar pattern with some of the back leg designs on shin pads and all over the shoulder pads each company has out currently. Warrior, however, had some nice anatomic features on their protective line which I took as a major benefit when perusing their Dynasty protective line.

Warrior’s Axysym technology is something that has been integrated throughout their equipment for 2013. From sticks to goaltender chest pads, it is a fit system designed to maximize mobility without sacrificing protection. The primary areas affected by the Axysym design on the protective line is the forearm and bicep wrap (elbow pad), the shin and calve area (shin pad) and the chest (shoulder pad).

The way Warrior worked the Axysym into each piece of equipment managed to focus the fit of the equipment on the portion of the body that needed the most freedom of movement. In addition, Warrior’s Sling Wrap (elbow pad and shin pads) and 2-Timer straps allow for a snug, fully adjustable fit for the wearer.

Specifically with the Sling Wrap, the strap focuses on the one area which can use the most additional support. The Sling Wrap will keep you from doing the raised arm elbow pad pull 200 times per game. Add in the 2-Timer strapping which appear to be a more heavy duty Velcro strap system designed to fit you well and not move during the course of a game.

The shin pads look particularly snug as the Sling Wrap strap ends just below the knee on the front but actually comes up and around the calve at a 45-degree angle (as opposed to just wrapping straight around). In addition the primary strap keeps the protective calf wrap fully secured.

Perhaps the single most impressive feature on Warrior’s protective line is the 2-Way Smart Cap system. The knee and shin areas, elbow and shoulder caps are all built with a multi-layer cap that includes compressed plastic along with HD foam as well. The shoulder and elbow caps actually have a four-layer build that includes the 2-Way foam cap (meets NHL standards) along with the compressed plastic and HD foam. The shin pad is more of a traditional build with the hard plastic shell and HD foam over the comfort liner.

All of the Warrior protective gear uses the yellow War-Tech liner system with Polygiene bacteria and odor fighter built in. This is an impressive line from top to bottom that builds nicely on the reputation Warrior already carries in their stick and glove construction.

When the time finally comes to ditch my current gear, the Dynasty line will be one of the first sets that I strap on in the store.

CCM/Reebok Demo Day: Testing the RBZ Skate and Stick

Demo Day for the CCM RBZ Skate and RBZ Stage 2 Stick
Demo Day for the CCM RBZ Skate and RBZ Stage 2 Stick

The day is nearing in which the hockey world will be graced with the RBZ Stage 2 stick and the new RBZ skates. As the company prepares to launch the next step in a line that has boomed with popularity, Great Skate had a chance to take an inside look at both the RBZ Stage 2 stick and RBZ skate.

A small group of guys got the full treatment from our CCM reps as they had a full lineup of the RBZ skate to choose from and about two-dozen RBZ Stage 2 sticks to choose from. The skate was quite informal, just shooting and passing in warm up suits and eventually things morphed into a center ice three-on-three scrimmage. What I did notice from spinning around the ice is that the RBZ skate is the real deal.

We got a brief rundown of some of the changes and improvements to the RBZ skate as compared to the U+ line that came before it. The RBZ has a full composite boot and is built with a little more pitch for a better angle of attack and increased agility. The skate is also built 4mm higher than previous skates. This factors with the aggressive pitch to give the skater a better radius for tighter turns and cuts.

The composite boot allows for a lighter build that increases your power on the ice. They also run a little larger than you might expect. I’m a size 12 shoe and typically wear a 10 or 10.5 in a skate. The pair of RBZs that I had on yesterday were 9.5 and fit quite well. As a side note, the skates I had were EE width which gave them a little play in the ankle and arch but it wasn’t too noticeable on the ice. There’s no doubt that a slightly more narrow boot would give a more snug fit.

On the ice the skate is light and responsive. I found myself making effortless cuts and I felt that my stride was powerful. I took a few hard laps and in-zone skates during the ice time to see how the skate felt in more of an in-game setting and they were great. Bear in mind that these were basically out of the box and right onto the ice. The wider boot may have factored into this, but I didn’t feel any ill effects from wearing a brand new skate without any sort of break in period.

As for the sticks, I have to say the Stage 2 stole the show. I’ve used an RBZ and I loved the pop that you get off the blade. The Speed Channels aren’t a gimmick and the hot blade they’ve created is something you feel on the ice. The original RBZ did have one drawback and that was the balance. It was a blade heavy stick and there was a strange sensation when using it because of the center of gravity.

With the Stage 2 this isn’t an issue. In addition to a new graphic scheme, CCM worked out the weighting issues so that this already incredibly light stick has the balance and feel you would expect.

I was fairly accurate – or as accurate as I could be – when shooting and the upgraded speed channels gave my slap shot a noticeable pop. When you consider the few shortcomings the original RBZ and factor in the changes made for the Stage 2, the word upgrade almost doesn’t do it justice.

Keep your eyes peeled for the new RBZ skate, Stage 2 stick and the Reebok Ribcor to hit the shelves at Great Skate later this summer. You won’t want to miss out on picking up these new models.

On the Ice: Bauer IMS 9.0 helmet

Bauer IMS 9.0 Hockey Helmet
Bauer IMS 9.0 Ice Hockey Helmet

One very interesting development this year was Bauer’s acquisition of the Messier helmet line. The agreement brought the Messier line’s groundbreaking SEVEN technology to an already well received family of Bauer helmets.

In addition to the IMS 11 and IMS 7.0, there are fingerprints from the Messier line all over Bauer’s new helmets. The new technology and introduction of Poron XRD foam into the RE-AKT and IMS 9.0 are great new additions and have really separated the Bauer line into a league of their own.

I recently picked up an IMS 9.0 for trial on the ice and I’ve had a few icetimes with it since getting it. There aren’t many things wrong with this helmet.

First things first, it has a perfect mix of soft, conforming padding in specific areas that mixes well with the harder HD foam in high-impact zones. I’ve found that the HD foam on many top end models make the helmet somewhat uncomfortable and the softer, more traditional set up that is so popular in the NHL doesn’t have the varied protection that I value. The IMS 9.0 finds that happy medium.

Poron XRD is supple by design. There are two large panels on either side of the helmet to help with side impact collisions. The Poron XRD actually wraps around the entire helmet (giving 360 degrees of protection) but is plainly visible just behind your temples. In addition, the brown and the back of the head have soft pads that keep the helmet snug against your head. The key here is that it’s not just a pillowy pad. It’s closer to the heat molding memory foam that still offers excellent protection.

The Poron XRD plays very well with the Vertex Foam that takes the place of traditional EPP foam that is found in such helmets as the 5100 and 4500.

The single adjustment location on the crown of the helmet is somewhat unusual, but it doesn’t work any differently from the old double wing adjustment from past Bauer helmets. One super awesome feature is that the mounts for the j-clips or visor on the side of the helmet have been embedded into the temple pads. This keeps those pesky little pieces of hardware in the same spot and makes switching out cages and visors much easier.

The only adjustment I have had to make it to the height of the helmet. I was previously wearing a 5100 which sat low on my head and brow. The 9.0 sits higher on my head, thus feeling a little different than my old 5100. This wasn’t a surprise for me, however. The construction of the helmet indicates that the 9.0 (and likely the RE-AKT) would rest a little higher on a player’s head than some older helmets. The beauty of this is there isn’t a decrease in how safe I feel in the helmet.

In all, I love the feel and I haven’t expressed any doubt over the protection of this helmet. It’s definitely worth a serious look the next time you’re considering a new helmet.

On the Ice: Easton Mako skates

Easton Mako Ice Hockey Skate
Easton Mako Ice Hockey Skates

Our second installment of On the Ice comes in a different gear category than the initial review of the Warrior Dynasty stick. I’ve been able to try out a pair of Easton’s newest skate, the Mako.

The Mako is a new release from Easton and actually is a standalone product compared to the Stealth skate line which offers a number of different models to select. The focus of this skate is all about speed. From the heat moldable composite upper, the new CXN holder, aggressive pitch angle and the new Extendon feature, the Mako is designed for the sole purpose of speed.

With a composite construction the Mako skate is incredibly light and that feature is something that is noticeable from the first time you take it off the wall. However, the boot design offers more than just weight reduction. Easton’s asymmetrical design is focused to increase side-to-side agility for the player. In addition, the aggressively angle of the boot and holder offer a forward pitch that is not only conducive for straight ahead speed but also cornering and agility.

These features help to promote Easton’s new “Art of Speed” slogan. However, they aren’t just window dressings. The aggressive forward pitch and lightweight construction are complimented by the Extendon guard; built to promote the natural stride of a hockey player. The Extendon is a new take on the typical tendon guard on a normal pair of skates – and it does take a little getting used to. The slightly longer guard is designed to not only promote full extension in loading your stride but also immediate recovery after pushing off. It almost serves like a rubberband in a sense; aiding the skater in each and every stride.

The general look of the skate is somewhat odd, especially if you’re someone who is used to a traditional skate with a black boot and white holder. However, the sharp orange accents the compliment the black and silver on the boot looks pretty great. In fact, for as funky of a design this skate has, it passes the mirror test with flying colors.

It’s also appealing to more and more NHL professionals. Easton athletes like Derek Roy were wearing the Mako throughout this season and it was gaining a strong foothold (no pun intended) with the professional crowd. For a regular guy like myself, if was thoroughly impressed with the skate.

Out of the Box

If there is one thing that needs to be impressed upon anyone considering this skate it is that you cannot judge the fit before you bake it. Not only is the entire boot thermally formed but the tongue is as well. When you first put the skate on it is stiff, narrow and rather unforgiving. In fact, it is incredibly difficult to lace prior to being baked. However, once these are baked they are an entirely different skate. Your foot will slide into the boot like butter and once you’re laced up the skate actually wraps itself around your foot.

The reason I feel it is so important to impress this upon you is because this skate is designed to be fully customized to the wearer’s foot. While other skate models feel better once they’ve been baked, the Mako has to be baked. The result ends up being a ridiculously comfortable skate that is formed around your entire foot.

The Extendon feels a little different when you first get the skates on and it is because it sits a little closer to your leg (as it is designed to move back and forth with your stride) which creates an unusual sensation when you first lace up the skates. However the adjustment period for that is short as there is no discomfort created by the feature.

Another thing that threw me off was the tongue. It is fully heat formed and has a thick plastic insert on the top. Before baking it is somewhat cumbersome and difficult to deal with. Once you’ve baked the skates it is pliable and ends up contouring around the top of your foot and up through the ankle. Like with the initially stiff boot, the tongue is a completely different piece of the puzzle after the skates spend some time in the oven.

On the Ice

While I needed to wait a couple of weeks to get these on the ice, I didn’t have a ton of time to break them in at home. Aside from lacing them up a couple of times while watching TV, the skates didn’t get too much time to be broken in prior to their first ice time. This was a major concern for me at my first game in them.

Yet, after my first game I felt no ill effects. I didn’t have any blisters, my feet weren’t sore and I was amazed that after baking the skate and sporting it for a couple of hours at home that these were game ready. While your experience may differ a bit, I’ve found that most who are using the Mako determined they are all but game ready after getting baked and forming to your feet.

I have to say this was a major relief to me after watching my college teammates suffer through breaking in skates year after year.

The biggest adjustment for me on the ice was the forward pitch of these skates. Coming from CCM Pro Tacks, I was used to a flatter attack angle and a wider boot. The Mako has a much more pronounced forward pitch in addition to a more narrow fit. While the fit itself never became an issue, I found myself a little wobbly when I took my first few spins around on the skates. In fact, I had one moment early in the game in which I took twice the amount of time to turnaround than I usually would because I was still unsure on my feet.

What does all of that mean? Are these that difficult to get used to? The answer is no. By the midpoint of the first period I had fully settled into the skates and I can now say after a few ice times that these are a truly incredible product.

I am by no means a fast skater. In fact I’d contend that while technically sound I am actually brutally slow. Yet I’ve noticed my strides have been more powerful lately and my straight line speed has actually increased. The reason I can say that this is so noticeable is the way the skate feels if you take hard, aggressive strides. The construction of the boot and holder are so conducive to complimenting the motion of skating that you do feel the skate reacting with you as you go up and down the ice.

Easton hit it out of the park with the Mako skate. It is a highly evolved product that gives you noticeable results when you wear them. So long as you understand the difference in fit between the skate out of the box and the skate out of the oven, I’m confident that this would be on top of everyone’s shopping list when they’re looking for new skates.