Category Archives: Warrior

Holiday Gift Guide for goalies

CCM GP500 Goalie Pads
CCM GP500 Goalie Pads

With the holiday season upon us, goalies will certainly be filling their lists with all of the gear and accessories they’ve been hoping to get as the season has progressed. As you prepare to begin your shopping this year, keep some of these ideas in mind for the hockey players on your list:

One great gift that can easily be over looked is a safe, comfortable neck guard. Of all the neck guards on the market, it’s hard to beat the Vaughn VPC in that department. It’s a favorite of nearly every NHL goalie and would make a great addition to any goalie’s gift pile.

Goalies also are never lost without a good practice jersey. So often you see netminders sporting old game jerseys during practices. Grab your goalie a proper goalie cut practice jersey that can be used at practice and even at goalie camp in the summertime.

There are also some cool new sticks on the market this season and finding the newest composite to tie up with a bow would make a number of goalies very happy. If you’re going to go big, you can’t go wrong with the Bauer Reactor 6000. It’s the top composite on the market today and offers unparalleled performance in terms of weight and balance. If the goalie you’re shopping for is more of a traditionalist, you can’t go wrong with the CCM 400 or Warrior Swagger. Both are great, durable sticks that slot in at a competitive price point.

If it’s come time to upgrade one of your major equipment categories, Great Skate has a phenomenal selection both in-store and online in terms of pads, blockers and gloves. Our in-store goal crease will allow you to try on and get a feel for any of the gear that you have your eye on this holiday season.

25% off all Hockey Gear (13-Hour) Black Friday Sale

25% off all Hockey Gear (13-Hour) Black Friday Sale
25% off all Hockey Gear (13-Hour) Black Friday Sale

Starting on Friday November 29, 2013 for 13-hours, receive 25% off your purchase at both Great Skate and Greatskate.com. If you are going to be shopping online you can take advantage of early shopping and In-Store pickup. When shopping online please use Promotional Code GS2013 (Please note that your discount will be deducted at the time of shipping)

Great Skate will be opening a bit early on Friday morning starting at 8am, so if you or someone you know is out shopping at Best Buy, Target, and Kohl’s tell them to stop by and check out our great deals. Choose from all major manufacturers such as Bauer, CCM, Easton, Reebok, Warrior, & Vaughn. If a Bauer APX stick is on your list this year you won’t find a better deal than at Great Skate!

Don’t forget to ask about our door buster deals such as 50% off Bauer TotalONE Colored LE Composite Sticks, Easton Mako, & Easton Stealth RS II Sticks. How can you beat these deals? 

When it comes down to Fit, Feel, Performance, Dedication look no further than Great Skate. Stop by Friday morning at 3395 Sheridan Drive / Amherst / NY / 14226. If you aren’t from WNY give us a call at 1-800-828-7496. As always some restrictions may apply (MAP) click here or call for details.

Take advantage of this sale today. It wont last long. GAME ON!

Happy Thanksgiving

 

Great Skate Staff

Headshots dominate early NHL headlines

Headshots dominate early NHL headlines
Headshots dominate early NHL headlines

A rash of suspensions handed down from the NHL’s Department of Player Safety in a response to a ridiculous number of illegal checks through the first month of the NHL season has been the primary focus of fans and media members alike.

John Scott’s elbow to Louis Ericsson’s head was the exclamation point on a two-week span that saw a handful of ugly hits and somewhat lengthy suspensions doled out as punishment  joined Pat Kaleta as the sole set of teammates on the list of suspended players and the combined games between the two illustrates the need for more strict policing both on and off the ice.

The worst side effect from these hits – outside of the media circus they often spark – is the long-term effects that players will suffer from repeated head injuries. With all the steps the NHL has taken in an attempt to curb head contact and dangerous concussions, it’s hard to say what type of effect the recent legislation has had.

Companies like Bauer, CCM, Easton and Warrior who each have a major claim in the helmet market have each taken strides to introduce technologically advanced helmets with features designed to help reduce the chances that a concussion will occur. The Bauer RE-AKT is the current trail blazer in this category as the Suspend-Tech liner introduces a padded liner designed to move independently from the helmet shell; thus limiting the chances that a jarring blow to the shell will cause the head and brain to react in a similar manner.

Interestingly enough, one of the most effective helmet designs with concussion prevention in mind was the M11 helmet that was on the market recently. Bauer has taken over the line and is utilizing the Seven technology in their new IMS line.

However, in the NHL at least, these technologically advanced helmets aren’t the norm. Many professionals choose to go the comfortable route with a VN Foam liner in their helmet. That isn’t to say that a player’s choice in helmets has anything to do with keeping them free from concussions, but the use of old technology can’t be helping, either.

Football and hockey have both shown that no matter what type of helmet you’re using that jarring collisions that cause the head to be shaken or rattled in a violent matter will likely lead to some concussion-like symptoms. Even on plays without head contact, violently altering a body’s motion has the ability to cause a concussion due to the whiplash effect.

Preventing head injuries is ultimately on the onus of the players. At the youth and professional levels, the responsibility falls on the participants to avoid dangerous hits, slow down when they see their opponents numbers and be smart when lowering a hit.

Not one of the hits that led to a suspension in the NHL this year showed any sort of caution or care for the opponent. In a sport as physical and competitive as hockey this isn’t necessarily a surprise. However, the reckless actions that were taken by John Scott, Cody McLeod and Maxim Lapierre could have been easily prevented had the player processed what they were doing prior to leading with their elbow or throwing their opponent into the boards head first.

Goons, enforcers and grinders aren’t the lone culprits here either. Skill players who get away with taking liberties due to their status is a trend that cannot continue. While the physical force of the game isn’t likely to be drastically changed anytime soon, longer suspensions for violators in these cases will continue to serve as the deterrent for these plays.

What they’re wearing: Thomas Vanek

What they’re wearing: Thomas Vanek
What they’re wearing: Thomas Vanek

He’s the major piece in the first major blockbuster of the NHL season. Thomas Vanek was shipped to Long Island on October 27 and has plenty of new gear on his hands now that he’s suiting up with the Islanders. Here’s a look at the products that Vanek’s wearing this season.

Skates: CCM RBZ

Vanek, when he’s not using Warrior, is using CCM. He graduated to the RBZ this season after wearing the U+ for the last year or two. Vanek is a sneaky quick player who happens to spend a lot of time in front of the net. He needs a tough, durable skate that’s lightweight and the RBZ meets each and every one of those requirements.

Gloves: Warrior Covert

Warrior’s Franchise line may be the favorite among most players, but the Covert is a very close second. A glove with an anatomic build, the Covert offers a snug fit and excellent responsiveness. Exactly the type of glove a sniper like Vanek would want.

Helmet: CCM V08 with an Oakley Visor

Yet another pro who prefers the traditional VN foam liner to than of the more technologically advanced helmets that are on the market. A number of years ago Vanek was sporting the old Mission Intake before changing over to the CCM in the past few years. It’s hard to argue as the CCM helmet line passes the comfort, protection and mirror tests with ease. Vanek’s Oakley visor is the Pro Straight small. It’s a slightly scaled down version of Oakley’s Pro Straight with a small indent along the bottom edge. It’s not a notch or even curve, but simply a small change of height (more or less) that allows for a very nice field of vision.

Stick: Warrior Covert

If there’s one thing to be said about Vanek it’s that he’s a brand loyal guy. Aside from changing up his helmet brand, he’s been using nearly the same thing for about half a decade. Aside from graduating to new models each year, Vanek has been scoring piles of goals with Warrior sticks dating all the way back to the Dolomite. He’s now sporting the Covert taking advantage of the Dagger Taper technology and Warrior’s growing reputation for building some of the game’s best sticks.

Protective:

It’s hard to make out, but it does appear that Vanek is rocking Warrior’s Covert pant based on the Velcro on the inner thigh. However, it’s just as likely that he’s using an Islanders shell while continuing to use his Sabres pants. If that’s the case he could be in anything from a Warrior Hustler to even another company’s pant.

Leave a comment for us below on some players you’d like to see profiled in the What They’re Wearing section. 

Industry Q&A: Keith Perera on the new Covert LT and ST

Industry Q&A: Keith Perera on the new Covert LT and ST
Industry Q&A: Keith Perera on the new Covert LT and ST

A while back Keith Perera took some time to chat with us about his job with Warrior and a few cool features of their stick line. With the new Covert ST and LT in stores now, Keith took a few more minutes to give an inside look at what makes these two new sticks so fantastic.

GS: Tell us about the new sticks, what remains the same from last year’s Covert line and what has been added?

KP: The Covert is all about speed and quick release. So we set out to make our sticks lighter, load easier and kick back stronger – improving on an already successful line.

Our new product has the “LT” designation for a reason. We wanted to make each stick the lightest we could possibly make it without sacrificing durability, and in some cases, making them more durable.

We have also added a “ST” model stick at the very high-end DT1 model to give Stronger players low kick with added twist resistance which then helps accuracy.

GS: The Covert was a very popular model last year – particularly with the various price point models. What do you think made the entire line so popular with players?

KP: Covert had a very distinct feel and kick. When a player got to try the product, they immediately felt the Dagger Taper load and release the puck with ease and speed. Covert also featured our newest blade designed with durability and weight in mind. We now have the lowest return rate in our history and it’s all due to those new blade features. They are lighter and stronger.

GS: How do you think the new features will add to the Covert’s popularity?

KP: Making the product lighter and increasing the recoil will really get more players to notice the Covert line. The biggest thing for us is weight – players we poll always tell us they want the stick to feel light and swing light. The very next thing they say is they don’t want the stick to break. It’s has always been a hockey paradox in the past (Light & Durable), but with some of our new strategic R&D partners in the Aerospace and Defense fields, it has become a reality.

GS: I know you don’t work with pros too often but did you get an idea of positive feedback those guys were giving on the Covert line last year?

KP: Great question, our momentum is really turning here. This off-season was our best ever! Players were hearing more from other players that our sticks were not breaking and were performing incredibly well. That R&D partner also allowed us to produce our lightest pro stick and it was really durable. Players were amazed! We added 30 new players to our stable and it was purely based on product. We did sign some big new names (Pacioretty, Clarkson) but we would have never had a chance with those guys if our product was not good. Money is fine, but product is KING

GS: How much of that feedback, if any, went into the design of the LT and ST models?

KP: Features like HiFusedST and new blade construction did come from needs from PRO. Pros bring very acute problems to our engineering team. Requests like “Make the stiffest blade ever” to the challenge of “keeping Chara’s blade from opening up” are things they get all the time from our players or our reps in the dressing rooms trying to dial-in a player’s spec. Sometimes these trickle down to our retail product (ex. TwinSpar, StrongArm, HiFusedST), but some features don’t. There aren’t that many “Charas” out there…imagine?!

GS: Should we expect to see a lot of NHLers using these models this season?

KP: You will see some major additions to our player stable. We’ve added players all over the league. Abdelkader, Franzen, Iginla are just to name a few. The other thing you’ll notice is that most of our players will be using our LT or ST graphic. This will also make the impression of our players larger since they are using one of 3 graphics available. In the past, we would have up to 5 graphics available to our pros and it really diluted our product presence in the NHL.

GS: When was the decision made to offer two different models (ST and LT) for this year?

KP: The decision was a tough one but came out of utility. We were finding our AAA testers loving the LT quick release Dagger construction but they were complaining that it was too “whippy or active” down low. We got that from pros too and we tested the HiFusedST construction with the same AAA players and they loved the quick release + Accuracy. We found that some players did not need all the Dagger Taper extra flex since they generated enough power and force themselves. What those stronger players needed was added twist resistance. That’s exactly what HiFusedST does, since the fuse point of the stick is near the player’s lower hand. It resists twist, thus giving the player low kick with more accuracy. Many players told us it felt like the old Easton SE16, which was very popular with better players a few years ago.

GS: Can you talk about a few more benefits of the LT?

KP: LT is all about making our sticks LighT. Since we were building “smarter sticks” (better engineered, more durable) we found new ways to pull excess weight out without affecting durability. It was an amazing discovery. Our lower priced models are incredibly light for the price. As a quick example, our $99 DT4LT weighed 40g lighter than a major competitors’ $110 stick… and is lighter than everyone’s $99 stick, by quite a bit.

GS: Can you give a more detailed breakdown of the Dagger technology and specifically the upgrades made with the Dagger T2?

KP: Dagger Taper is a wonderfully simple and effective technology for a hockey stick. The stick tapers to a point down very low in the stick and, in turn, that’s where the stick flexes. Pretty simple. This simple notion has resonated with players and they are feeling the benefits of this super low kick point. With this new line, we wanted to improve on the RECOIL of Dagger. Dagger loads and flexes very easily, but we wanted it to recoil back and return energy back to the puck. So we placed Uni-Directional fibers in the taper to help promote that kick-back effect. We also extended the internal structures from our blades into the taper area to help provide a more “connected” feel for the blade and taper to work together. Those two enhancements helped push Dagger Taper to the next level.

GS: A number of NHLers were using custom colored Coverts throughout the year last season. Is there an opportunity that various colors will be made available to the public with the new models or even the former Covert line?

KP: We are playing with the idea of offering these “Pro Graphic” build ability on our customizer, but nothing has been finalized as yet. Sorry!

GS: Should we expect to see a similar evolution to the Dynasty AX1 line? If so, can you provide any hints?

KP: I can’t speak to the Dynasty line as yet, but I can in a couple months. We just presented all the info on the new line to our sales force and after all our dealers have had a chance to see it and write orders for it we can talk about it.

GS: The Covert gloves were finally released and feel phenomenal (I’m a fan of a more snug fit glove). What has the reaction been to them – both from pros and amatuers?

KP: I’m not really close to our glove product (Chris J is our PM for protective) but from 3rd hand I know that people love the feel of them. I’m also a fan of the Covert…

GS: Last time you couldn’t offer much in terms of what we can expect next from Warrior. Are you able to offer any hints as to what we may see in the coming months?

KP: I wish I could, but I can’t get in to too much detail. All I can say is – 2014 is going to blow the doors off. We consciously took a step back 2yrs ago, refocused, reorganized and made our product better performing with durability. Now it’s time for us to really fly our brand flag…and if you saw how we did it when we started, you get the idea. So I’ll leave it at that.

On the Ice: Warrior Dynasty AX1, revisited

Dynasty AX1 Hockey Stick
Dynasty AX1 Composite Hockey Stick

A while back we made the Warrior Dynasty our first on-ice review. Now, six months later, I want to revisit some of the thoughts I shared after the first few times I used the stick and add onto what was previously a glowing review.

In case you missed the original review, here’s a refresher course for you.

The looks and “out of the box” impressions of this stick haven’t changed since I first acquired it. The simple graphics look great and the Velvet Touch grip is a pefect mix of tacky and smooth that fits the type of finish I like to have on a stick.

In fact, the Velvet Touch may actually be superior to other options simply because it’s the best of both worlds. It has the Goldilocks effect in that it offers some resistance and tug during play but it isn’t a super sticky grip that will get in the way, either. As I’ve used the stick more and more, the finish has worn a bit, but since it wasn’t a traditional grip finish, the performance and feel of the stick hasn’t changed with wear.

After my first few ice times I had really grown to love the stick. It was durable (taking a number of two-hand hacks) and lightweight. The adjustment I needed to make to the thinner blade took a game or two, but now I don’t even notice a difference from what I was using previously.

It didn’t take long to start potting goals with the new stick and the end of my winter season was choc-full of goals and assists off the blade of my new stick. A short while into the summer I began using an RBZ Stage 2 but I wasn’t enjoying as much success with it as I was the Dynasty. AS I opened yet another winter schedule, I reverted back to the Warrior and found my stickhandling, shooting and passing improved greatly by switching sticks.

Perhaps it was mental, but I felt a much stronger kick from the Dynasty than I had with the sticks I had played with over the summer. What is still impressive to this day is that my passing with the Dynasty is so crisp. I’m able to lay flat backhand saucer passes with ease and I get a great snap on forehand passes when I’m attempting to fit the puck into a tight space.

I have to think the Strongarm and AXYSYM technology are to thank for the feel I get using this stick. Not only do my wrist shots fire off the stick, but I have solid power in all facets of shooting and passing.

Even though this stick was shuffled to second string for a short period of time in the summer, it saw plenty of action and is no worse for wear because of it. Warrior has been making serious strides to add reinforcements where they’re needed most to their new sticks and this is a testament to that new technology. This stick is an impressive model and is still available on the shelves – alongside Warrior’s newest Covert line – today.

New Covert goes further undercover for Warrior

Warrior Covert DT1LT Senior Composite Hockey Stick - 85 Flex
Warrior Covert DT1LT Senior Composite Hockey Stick – 85 Flex

Plenty of players took the ice with Warrior’s Dagger Technology on the Covert line-up last season. Warrior’s elite model, the DT1 was one of the most popular sticks on the market last year.

The Covert is back for another run with new and improved technology geared to push it to the next level.

The DT1 LT and ST models are ready to find their way to stores, giving players a pair of options when it comes to picking a new stick for the upcoming season.

Both sticks utilize Dagger 2 Technology, which is designed to improve the revolutionary flex-improving technology that was a major part of the Covert’s success in 2012-13. The Dagger 2 further enhances the flex and kick point, providing more kick on shots. In addition, the twinspar technology that was built into Warrior’s blades last season have been extended up into the Dagger tip as an addition compliment to the Dagger 2 features.

The Twinspar EXT is similar, in a way, to the thinking behind the Reebok Ribcor technology. By strengthening the kick point of the stick, Twinspar EXT serves as an additional piece of stick technology that is included as a way to increase kick.

Specifically, the new DT1 line includes the LT and the ST models. The LT is built with features to lighten the shaft and blade in order to promote increased balance and better performance. On the other hand, the ST has a stronger, reinforced design that is perfectly designed for stronger players looking to put more behind their shots.

Other features that are back for 2013-14 are the carbon plated blade and Aramid sole which are both carry over features from previous models designed for durability and longevity of the product.  As someone who had the opportunity to see Warrior’s new technology at work with the Dynasty last season, I fully expect the new Covert line to surpass the innovations introduced last year.

What They’re Wearing: Cory Schneider

What They’re Wearing: Cory Schneider
What They’re Wearing: Cory Schneider

One of the best parts of the start of a new hockey season is all of the new goalie equipment that gets broken in during training camp and into the start of the season. New mask paint, pads and the like makes the first few weeks of the season fun.

While we are still a few weeks away from seeing all the new gear that goalies will be wearing, I wanted to take the chance to evaluate the gear worn by New Jersey’s newest netminder, Cory Schneider.

Mask: Bauer 961 – This is a classic throughout the NHL. It is a lightweight mask that offers great protection. It also has the iconic shape of Bauer’s design team that is reflected in products like the NME mask series.

Blocker & Glove: CCM E-Flex – CCM’s newest model that debuted this season. Designed by Lefevbre – the same guy who designs the Reebok line – the E-Flex is a great looking set that incorporates a number of design standards that have made Lefevbre designed equipment so popular over the years. Schneider specifically uses the one-piece cuff on the E-Flex catch glove as can be seen in this photo.

Pads: Vaughn Velocity V5: Schneider, like myself, is a fan of a softer, flexible pad. One of the few goalies in the league to use a double break on the outer roll of his pad, Schneider has what looks to be a very traditional set up for his leg pads (and his glove set too). While many NHL goalies use a number of special customizations on their pads, there doesn’t seem to be many on Schneider’s set. One interesting thing about his choice of an all-white design is he had been using a really cool color scheme earlier in the year before switching.

Stick: Warrior Swagger: Just a traditional white-based Swagger for Schneider. I’d personally would go blue with green trim if he’s keeping his pads all white, but that’s just my personal preference.

Skates: It is very hard to tell from the picture available on the web, but it would appear that Schneider is using one of the high-end models from Bauer. I’d venture a guess that they’re TotalOne skates or something similar based on the cowling and look of the boot. Leave a thought in the comments section if you have more information on this.

If you have a candidate for What They’re Wearing, please contact us on @greatskateblog or leave your recommendation in the comment section.

Finding the helmet that’s right for you

Bauer IMS 9.0 Hockey Helmet
Bauer IMS 9.0 Ice Hockey Helmet

In the dizzying world of new sticks, varying glove designs and new models of skates being unveiled each season, it can be easy to overlook the importance of purchasing a helmet that is going to offer comfort and, most importantly, protection.

There is a plethora of available helmet manufacturers and models to choose from on the market today and figuring out which one works best for you or your child can be difficult. While picking the shiny new model that Pat Kane was wearing on TV may be the temptation, often there are other factors to consider when evaluating a helmet purchase.

First off, you have to ensure that the helmets you’re trying on will fit properly. This means finding a helmet that fits comfortably on your head, that doesn’t wobble when secured and one that doesn’t apply too much pressure either. Some of this focuses on comfort, but that’s very important. Uncomfortable helmets will drive the wearer to loosen them to increase comfort; this decreases the safety of the helmet ten-fold.

A snug helmet should simply provide a snug fit on your head. It shouldn’t move side-to-side or rotate horizontally, either. Again, it shouldn’t be so tight that it is uncomfortable while it’s being worn.

Finding the right size helmet isn’t necessarily a major bugaboo lately since a vast majority of models can be adjusted on the fly. However, just because you wear a large now doesn’t mean that another large will fit the exact same way. For example, the Bauer IMS 9 sits a little higher on the head and has a slightly more snug fit than a helmet like the CCM V08 which sits lower and fits larger than the IMS. So be sure to try on and fully adjust each helmet model you’re considering before making a final decision. The last thing you need is to snag what you think is your size off the shelf only to find that it fits too large once you get it home.

Another important factor to consider in terms of comfort and fit is the construction of different helmets. Not only in terms of the shell design but also the interior padding. Every company uses a different approach with their helmets lately with some sitting higher on the head and others sitting lower. In addition, each company uses varying levels of design for the guts of their helmets too. For example, Bauer uses a boatload of new technology like Suspend-Tech and PORON foam in the RE-AKT and IMS 9 helmets while the mainstay 4500 still uses a basic VN foam liner.

VN foam is the traditional, soft foam that can be found in many helmets in ice rinks around North America. It is soft and molds well to your head after time providing a high level of comfort. However, VN foam doesn’t provide the same type of resistance as can be found with a more high-tech product like EPP foam or Bauer’s new PORON product.

Many helmets have made EPP foam the primary liner for their helmets as it guards well against high-impact collisions better than most other products. Helmets like the Easton E700 and Reebok 11K use an EPP liner with comfort padding throughout to maximize protection and comfort. One of my personal favorite helmets is my Reebok 8K that uses a similar design to the current 11K helmet.

Of course, with new technology comes new expenses and sometimes breaking the bank isn’t the most vital step to take when purchasing a helmet. For example, a youngster playing mite or squirt hockey won’t need the same type of impact protection as a Triple-A midget or even a junior player. A the risk of high-speed collisions increases with the level of play, the need for increased protection will increase as well.

Perhaps the most important thing to remember is that no helmet is concussion-proof. Even non-head impact hits can cause the whiplash effect that causes concussions. A helmet designed by NASA wouldn’t help you then. Well, probably not.

The next time you’re in Great Skate picking out a helmet be sure to know the model type you’re searching for. Do you need a helmet like the RE-AKT or 11K that offer an elite level of protection? Or is something like the Warrior Krown 360 or Easton helmets with their high-level of fit, comfort and impact protection something you’re looking for. Perhaps a Bauer 4500 or CCM V08 works best for you. Be sure to evaluate your options, ensure a proper fit before making any final decisions.

What they’re wearing – Ilya Kovachuk

What they’re wearing – Ilya Kovachuk
What they’re wearing – Ilya Kovachuk

Of all the happenings around the NHL this summer, nothing has been more shocking that Ilya Kovalchuck’s decision to retire from the NHL and return to play for SKA in the KHL. As he departs for Russia, we’ll take a look at the gear he sported in the NHL.

Unlike our first target, Mikhail Grigorenko, Kovalchuk is a very loyal Warrior client who hasn’t been seen in anything but their gear for a number of seasons. Since Kovalchuk doesn’t bounce around with the equipment he uses, tracking his set up was much easier. Here’s what he wore during the shortened 2013 season:

Skates: Bauer Vapor APX

Since Warrior has not jumped into the skate market just yet, Kovalchuk sports Bauer’s APX line for his skates. A popular, lightweight skate, the APX is used by countless professionals and is equally popular in youth and adult rec leagues across North America. No surprise to see a skill player like Kovalchuk in a skate that promotes agility and speed.

Gloves: Warrior Luxe

The Luxe line bridged the gap, in a way, between the Franchise and this year’s Covert line. While Kovalchuk didn’t get into a Covert full-time, the Luxe shares many of the same qualities. A more tapered, anatomically fit glove compared to the traditional four-roll fit of the Franchise, the Luxe provides a little more snug fit which is beneficial for players who like their gloves to respond in unison with their hands. While the Covert has taken up the Luxe’s mantle, you can find the same tapered comfort in Warrior’s new line.

Helmet: Bauer 4500 with Bauer visor

The one Warrior product Kovalchuk doesn’t use is the Krown 360 helmet. He opts for the traditional, low-profile 4500 model which is still prevalent in many areas. The 4500 uses a traditional foam liner as opposed to some of the high-end EPP foams with special inserts seen in such helmets as the Bauer RE-AKT or the Krown. Kovalchuk’s visor appears to be the Bauer J-cut which is very similar to the wave or aviator cut visors on the market but with an additional cut on the side of the visor. It’s a tough visor to find but the Bauer or Oakley aviator cut visors provide the same appearance.

Stick: Warrior Covert DT1 (red graphics)

A truer form of the word sniper may not be known when you consider the type of player Kovalchuk is. He certainly serves as an excellent poster boy for Warrior to show off the benefits of their Covert stick line. Kovalchuk uses a big right handed curve and sports a unique red based graphics package on his DT1.