Warrior breaking tradition with goal line

WarriorWarrior’s introduction to the hockey world has been far from ordinary. After building a strong niche with their stick and glove designs; the company recently ventured into the realm of goal equipment. Warrior pulled pad guru Pete Smith to head the design group building their goal equipment.

This isn’t a new strategy for Warrior, as they also pulled experts from other companies such and Innovative and MIA for their stick and glove departments in the past. For goaltending the company has really begun to push the envelope with their new line of chest protectors.

The new Ritual line has unveiled a number of new features that will easily set their equipment apart from traditional powers. For 2013, the Ritual Pro will have all of the new bells and whistles that include a few additions that haven’t been considered in chest pad design.

The most obvious of these changes is the Shockshield feature on the arms of the unit. This is a hard plastic cap that is designed to disperse the impact of the puck while increasing protection over the typical soft pad. The Shockshield is designed to float just above the rest of the arm guard to offer additional protection.

While this certainly seems like an interesting addition that will surely increase protection, one worry has to be the chance of rebounds coming off the arms harder than they usually would with a softer design. Even though the number of pucks bound to hit your arms on a game-to-game basis might be low, the difficulty of trapping a puck between your arm and chest could certainly be difficult should the plastic Shockshield kick pucks out.

Warrior also built the Shockshield to function in unison with the Axyflex system that is designed to maintain maximum protection while increasing comfort and flexibility of a goaltender’s arm. Much like a sliding toe bridge allows for your skate to be at a better angle of attack, the Axyflex has a similar feature on the outside of the elbow that slides in and out with the arm guard as you bend your elbow. Quite literally, the Axyflex is a mechanical hinge that will increase flexibility at what has traditionally been an awkward and bulky area of a chest protector.

Introducing the Axyflex and Shockshield designs are two very interesting steps for Warrior to take simply because they are truly groundbreaking additions. While the Ritual Pro has many features found with other manufacturers units, these two additions set the equipment apart for a very good reason.

The rest of the build is fairly traditional. The Ritual has more of a tapered fit as opposed to a bulky, boxy fit that should maximize mobility for the wearer. This is a design feature that is reflected throughout the line with the Ritual senior, intermediate and junior models.

The remainder of the line reflects many of the major design features seen on the pro model just without the two new innovations – Shockshield and Axyflex. This means that the rest of the line is a far more traditional looking and feeling chest protector that maintains the protective and mobility that Warrior has built in the past and has improved upon this year.

One feature that the entire line does have is the Adjustable Chest Height system. This is nothing more than a Velcro strapping system that will tighten or loosen the fit of the chest pad depending on how high a goaltender wishes to wear the unit. What is so interesting about this is that it eliminates the annoying nylon straps adjusted with various plastic pulleys that are the norm on nearly every other chest protector ever manufactured. The Ritual’s system makes adjustments incredibly quick, easy and comfortable as there is little guess work as to where the most comfortable setting will be found.

Warrior’s new Ritual chest protector line will be hitting stores soon and the impressive new designs will be available to the public before you know it. For those considering a new chest pad purchase this year, be sure to consult with a Great Skate associate once the Ritual is in stores.

Hockey Fitness: Build explosiveness

Hockey is a special game that combines just about every aspect of an individual’s athleticism. Hand-eye coordination, stamina, balance, strength and speed are all valuable traits for a player to possess. While it is incredibly important to have the endurance to give the same effort with three minutes left in the third period as you did on your first shift, having the explosiveness to burst past an opponent, rip a wrist shot top corner or make a clutch save is equally important. In fact, hockey is just as much about quick explosive movements as it is about endurance.

Developing and training the muscle groups that will make you a more explosive player is an important portion of any off-ice training regimen. Using traditional weight training like squats, lunges and other lower body exercises will aid in building the necessary strength in muscle groups used in skating but there are other exercises you may not be using already.

Plyometrics and speed ladder training can be supplemented as additional training tools to not only build and stimulate growth in certain muscle groups, but they will also help to increase foot speed, agility and explosiveness in a player.

Speed ladder training is particularly effective for building foot speed and agility as you can mix-and-match various movements to create a workout that is fully customized to your strengths and weaknesses. A few personal favorite speed ladder exercises include one and two-foot hops through the ladder and side-to-side, quick shuffles side-to-side through the ladder and explosive front steps and backpedals up and down the ladder. Additional hockey specific speed ladder drills can be found from Livestrong and this link.

  • One and two-foot hops: This can be done in a straight line or side-to-side with a speed ladder. As you gain more comfort and balance with the drill you will be able to increase the speed in which you do the drill. The motion is simple: hop on one or both feet in a straight line making sure to step in every box on the ladder. For side-to-side hop in and out of each box as you make your way down the length of the ladder.
  • Side-to-side shuffles: This is a slightly more advanced drill, but is particularly effective for goaltenders and building foot speed. For this drill begin on one side of the ladder and quickly shuffle across each box, making sure to touch both toes in the box as you make your way across. Move up and down the ladder in a zig-zag pattern moving in both directions. Increase your speed as you gain comfort with the drill.
  • Forward and backwards explosion: This is a terrific explosion drill that should help build strength and speed for that first step towards a loose puck. Begin on the side of the ladder and move to your left or right, one box at a time, taking hard steps backwards and forwards ensuring that you touch both feet in each box as you go.

Plyometric exercises are another great wrinkle to add to an off-ice workout that will not only focus on lower body but the upper body as well. With the focus on quick movements and building strength, plyometrics are a great thing to add to your offseason regimen.

Simple box jumps – as highlighted by this Livestrong article – are my personal favorite and can be done on steps or any firm object. The higher the object, the more energy needed to reach the top, thus, you will literally see your progress as you build more strength. Adding weight to this drill is a great challenge as even 10-pound dumbells will make the exercise that much more strenuous. Plyometric pushups – also noted in the article – are another interesting exercise. I have used a medicine ball in the past to balance myself and add a wrinkle to the exercise. Here are ten more plyometric exercises to build into your workout.

Hockey Fitness will be a running feature on the Great Skate blog that will feature different techniques and workouts to help you become a better player. Stay tuned for further installments of this series.

Warrior Dynasty AX1 Hockey Stick

The Warrior Dynasty AX1 hockey stick launched in the NHL last night and will be in stores February 1st.

  • It is a mid-flex stick with compression fibers on the back and under-sides of the stick to build up power and recoil into the puck.
  • It is a Hi-Fused stick with the fuse placed at the widest area of the shaft, with this there is no joint to interrupt flex and feel.
  • By raising the fuse this brings optimal balance and feel
  • The lower area of the shaft is thicker to reinforce the lower part of the stick to ensure a strong hold of the blade.
  • Less twisting and much more blade stability

The blade which is taking over the NHL brings the following construction.

  • Twinspar which is 2 carbon fiber support structures to reinforce the blade core. Increase blade endurance and strength by 40%
  • Hardcore X which brings the lightest blade package with 60% higher compression and resistance
  • Aramid Sole which brings a bulletproof wrap under the bottom edge of the blade to increase impact and toughness by 4 times of any high end stick warrior has produced in the past.
  • Finally a carbon plated glass fiber resists cracking and chipping and as well adds stiffness to the blade.

With all these pieces mixed into a bowl the AX1 stick is the stick of choice and a must for all high end players.

Bauer glove line offers a mixed bag

Bauer 4-Roll Pro Junior Hockey Gloves

Bauer 4-Roll Pro Junior Hockey Gloves

As different technology becomes prevalent across the board in the sport of hockey, the way companies institute said technology will change as well. Lightweight foams and design changes brought about a evolution in goaltending equipment in the early 2000s and now a similar trend is occurring in glove design.

Bauer’s new line of gloves sticks to the traditional design that many players have grown accustomed to along with a new, anatomically designed pattern that could be considered more futuristic.

The Four-Roll Pro gloves are wildly popular at many levels of the game, particularly at the NHL, NCAA and major junior levels. A cursory glance around the ice at the 2013 World Junior Championships would show a number of US and Canadian players sporting the popular style.

The Four-Roll is a very basic design that utilizes lightweight EPP foam and a lightweight and durable outer design. The overall fit of the glove is relatively loose and allows for movement of a player’s hand and wrist for maximum comfort and dexterity. This is very much a traditionalist take on how a hockey glove should look and fit. By extension, the basic design has earned Bauer legions of fans around the world.

Bauer Supreme One40 Junior Hockey Gloves

Bauer Supreme One40 Junior Hockey Gloves

Bauer, however also offers a couple of other glove designs that are far closer to the cutting edge of design and technology. The Supreme TotalOne and Vapor APX gloves are designed with a contoured, anatomic fit as compared to the loose fitting Four-Roll design. This design is slightly more similar to that of a lacrosse glove than a traditional hockey glove, but it is also the type of design that many manufacturers are moving towards.

Since every player is different, the anatomic fit isn’t always preferred. Of course the same can be said of the traditional fit too. While all three models come with high-density, lightweight foams and Bauer’s signature Thermo-Max liner, the DNA of the gloves – so to speak – is the same. It is in the fit and feel where the differences lie.

The Vapor APX, Bauer’s newest creation, has a three-piece finger and thumb construction that is the same as the knuckles in each of your fingers. The three-piece thumb is a new innovation that is designed to add more flexibility to your thumb while maintaining maximum protection.

The APX line does fit a bit looser than the TotalOne design and has what Bauer buds as a “taper fit” as opposed to the TotalOne’s true anatomic fit. The APX glove will still be significantly more snug than a Four-Roll glove, but will offer more movement than in the TotalOne build. The true difference comes around the wrist area where the TotalOne is designed to fit around and to move in unison with the player’s wrist, whereas the APX provides more space.

Bauer’s Free Flex Cuff is where this is prevalent as the section around the hand remains snug while the new cuff design provides ample flexibility and space for wrist movement. This cuff is also angled in a way to align with the natural shape of the human hand and wrist.

Bauer Vapor APX Hockey Gloves

Bauer Vapor APX Hockey Gloves

One drawback that some players may find with the APX line is the TECHNI-FLEX palm. This is actually a rather innovative addition by Bauer but it does add thickness to the palm in some areas. Ultimately this will increase the life of the palms of your gloves while continuing to maintain the type of performance that could be expected from, say a nash palm.

In addition to the pro models of each of these gloves, Great Skate carries the Vapor APX 7, 5 and 3 models which come in at a lower price point but are devoid of certain features. Each still sports the tapered anatomic design and Thermo-Max liner. However, each model uses a mix of nylon and leather build and do not have the three-piece fingers or thumbs.

These three models are terrific purchases that highlight all of the pros and cons of the Bauer glove line for the season. Of course, only the APX, TotalOne and Four-Roll pro lines will bring the full effect of Bauer’s most recent research and development.

Shop our full line of senior Bauer hockey gloves.

Strap a Rocket to the Puck – CCM RBZ Composite stick

CCM RBZ Senior Grip Composite Hockey Stick - 85 Flex

CCM RBZ Senior Grip Composite Hockey Stick – 85 Flex

CCM’s new partnership with golf giant TaylorMade is paying immediate dividends for scorers who are snatching up the new one-piece composite from CCM.

A host of new features and innovations to the stick has made the RBZ a hot item this season as the stick has quickly become a favorite of players everywhere. CCM’s new venture with TaylorMade includes the introduction of Power Swing, Custom Kick Point and Speedblade technology in their new stick.

Designed to compete with the top-end models from companies like Easton (Stealth RS) and Bauer (Vapor APX), the RBZ’s lightweight build keeps it in line with other ultra-light options that have been on the market this year. By comparison, the RBZ weighs in at about 447 grams to the 442 of the featherweight Stealth RS.

The weight and balance of the stick are quite impressive. The center of gravity combined with the lightweight construction contribute to the Power Swing technology with the RBZ.

In addition to the lightweight construction and sleek white matte finish – the sitck camouflages nicely with the boards and ice – the technological features are not just flashy names attached to the same old stick technology.

The Custom Kick Point is a truly innovative feature as the stick has been built with a true flex construction. Rather than having a single kick point at a specific section of the stick, the RBZ’s shaft is consistently stiff at any point. This means that the stick’s flex and kick point will adjust to where you place your hands as a player; guaranteeing a true flex whether you’re looking for a quick release wrist shot or bearing down on a slap shot. Unlike any stick that has come before it, the RBZ adapts to the style you play with thanks to the Custom Kick Point.

The Speedblade technology is perhaps the one piece of technology that most closely parallels what is found in the wildly successful Rocketballz line of drivers and fairway woods manufactured by TaylorMade. Rather than using a traditional foam core construction, TaylorMade pulled directly from their line of drivers to take advantage of C.O.R., or the trampoline effect.

Rather than filling the shaft with foam, which absorbs energy from the puck and thus reduces velocity, the RBZ eliminates foam altogether. The RBZ’s Speedblade is actually constructed with four hollow speed channels that create a hot face for the stick’s blade. This design feature maintains the same durability of a typical composite stick while adding noticeably more control and pop to each shot.

While the RBZ is a fairly new product, those that have had it on the ice have noticed an immediate benefit to their shots as the stick provides more pop thanks to the “hot face”. In addition, the Custom Kick Point allows any player to get the most out of the flex of their particular stick.

Great Skate has the RBZ in stock in a number of different blade patterns so get in now and strap your own rocket to the puck.

Goalie Pads: Too loose, too tight or just right?

Bauer Supreme One90 Sr. Goalie Pads

Bauer Supreme One90 Sr. Goalie Pads

Compared to the equipment that goaltenders had at their disposal 15 years ago, the position has changed drastically. Not only has the technical side of the game changed, but the effect equipment has on the position has changed as well.

With the evolution of the position, pads have evolved to complement the pro-fly style that is seen used by a majority of goaltenders at all levels. Not only has the design and technology of pads changed, the way goaltenders wear them has changed as well.

The way goaltenders wear their pads is one major difference from the way things were done just 15 short years ago.

Back when it was more important to have the goaltender and his pads move as one, the rule of thumb was to keep your pads farily tight from the bottom straps right up to the top. But as the butterfly style has become the predominant approach to goaltending, wearing a loose pad has become the norm.

The science behind this trend is fairly straightforward. The outer straps on a pad are designed to hold that pad against a goaltender’s leg and move as the goaltender dictates. The tighter the straps, the closer the pads mimic a goaltender’s movement. With the strapping system kept, the pads have more freedom to move around a goalie’s leg to provide the maximum amount of blocking surface.

While the traditional approach was to keep your pads tight to your legs so that a goaltender could move freely and react to the puck, the current methodology reflects the changes in both the technique and equipment used for the position. A fairly basic set up would be to have your bottom straps kept relatively tight and loosen as you go up the pad. Yet many goalies are keeping all of their straps quite loose with the hope of covering more ice and putting their equipment in a position to cover more net.

There are benefits to both styles, although modern pad technology can be negated if a pad is worn too tight. Pads like the new Vaughn Ventus and Warrior Ritual are designed with a flat blocking surface that is meant to lay flush against the ice. When a goalie drops into a butterfly with their straps loosened, the pad with rotate around his or her leg as the inner portion of the pad hits the ice. If the pad is too tight the face of the pad will end up laying on the ice rather than facing the shooter.

Many NHL goaltenders wear their pads very loose. A great example of this is Marc-Andre Fleury who wears his Reebok Premier Series 4 pads very loose. This not only ensures that the full face of the pad will be facing the shooter, but it also allows him to cheat the play in some ways. Of course this isn’t cheating in the traditional sense.

By wearing a very loose pad, Fleury’s pads almost hang on his legs as opposed to being strapped right against them. This strategy will allow the pad to hang closer to the ice surface when Fleury’s legs are pointed in a downward angle, thus limiting the distance they need to travel to cover the bottom of the net. This is a useful strategy and has become popular at all levels of hockey, but in order to be effective in utilizing a very loose pad, be sure your pads have interior support along the leg channel – typically Velcro to hold your knee and calf in place. If your pads don’t have these supports and you outer straps are kept loose there is a good chance your pads will flop around and it will be very difficult to move and make saves.

Not all goalies practice this, however. Those goaltenders who rely more on athleticism than simply blocking area use a slightly tighter set up to ensure the pad will not hinder their movement in the crease. Ryan Miller is a great example of a goalie who keeps his pads a bit tighter. Even Miller does keep his pads loose enough to rotate around his legs properly of course.

The key for any goaltender is to find a strapping set up that makes you feel comfortable, keeps you safe and utilizes all the technology your pads have to offer. All pads are designed to rotate around your legs and goalies of all ages should ensure there is some room for this to occur. Finding the most comfortable and effective way to strap your pads is important and you should practice with a few different variations to find what works best for you.

Not only will you be able to try out different ways to strap your pads in Great Skate’s goalie specific section, but you should also make sure the strap set-up you choose works on the ice.

Don’t just go into a game thinking that you want to wear your pads like Marc-Andre Fleury before you know if a very loose pad is right for you. Take a practice or two to try out a few different methods of strapping your pads so you know what will be comfortable and what makes you the best goalie you can be.

Gongshow Saucer King app

saucer kingPerhaps one of the best parts of playing hockey is the culture that surrounds the game. On and off the ice there is a certain bond that brings hockey players together. That bond is something that specific companies are taking advantage of.

One company in particular is Gongshow Gear Inc. Founded in 2002, Gongshow has quickly become a well-known hockey lifestyle apparel company. The key word is lifestyle. Between hats, t-shirts and sweatshirts, Gongshow has become a go-to for players to advertise their sport. Just a few months ago Gongshow took things a step further when they released their iPhone app called Saucer King.

The app is an interactive version of a beach and yard game that has been working its way into the summer routine of hockey players everywhere. Saucer King is similar to corn hole in terms of scheme, set up and rules but with a heavy hockey influence.

Here is what you need to play:

  • Can be played with one, two or four players
  • Equipment includes: two sticks, a few pucks, two mini stick nets and two boards to shoot from
  • Set the nets a certain distance apart with something set in the middle to “sauce” over
  • Teams stand on opposite ends and attempt to “sauce” the pucks into their opponents net
  • Add larger items to the middle to make scoring more difficult
  • Teams can play to any score that is determined to be appropriate

The game can be played just about anywhere and makes for a great, friendly competition to bring along to the beach, tailgates and other summer parties.

Since many hockey players live in a climate that makes beach life in January somewhat unattractive, the Saucer King app is available for free in the App Store through Apple and is nothing short of extremely challenging and incredibly addicting. The Saucer King app doesn’t only function as a single player game but can be taken to a multiplayer mode to play against players from around the world.

Be sure to check out Saucer King in your backyard, on your phone or both and be the first to introduce part of the hockey lifestyle to your friends. Also check out Great Skate for all the newest gear from Gongshow’s newest line of apparel.

Finding Your Hockey Stick Flex

Wandering through Great Skate’s stick section provides players with a plethora of options from manufacturers like Bauer, CCM, Reebok, Warrior and many others. Picking the right stick for you is determined by many factors that ultimately will help find the right stick for your game.

The right look, feel, weight, curve and flex of a stick are all determining factors for a player making this choice. Determining the right curve and weight is often something that has developed over a number of years and that has been determined by the style of game you play. In many ways the flex of any stick you buy will be determined in the same manner. However, how do you know which flex suits you best?

There are a number of different flexes available for players to choose from the range upwards to 110 (very stiff) to 40 (junior flex). It is important that the flex used by a player meets their specific strength and skill level.

In the case of young players who are still perfecting stickhandling and shooting, ensuring that the flex of your stick is adequate for your physical strength is just about all that needs to be considered. For those players who are stronger and more developed, finding an adequate flex will be more important.

First off, understand that different stick manufacturers utilize different practices and construction methods. Just like Ford, Toyota and Chevy all make different four-door cars, Bauer, CCM and Warrior make different composite sticks. So you may find that the 100 flex on the new CCM RBZ will feel differently from the 100 flex on a Bauer Total One or the new Warrior Covert.

Another thing to keep in mind is that lengthening or cutting down a stick will affect the flex. Each time you cut down a stick, you add stiffness to the original flex. You can expect to increase a stick’s flex by about 10 if you take off 2-3 inches. The opposite is true if you add length to a stick as it will add whip.

When it comes down to choosing the right flex there are a number of determining factors that come into play. For players who aren’t fully developed, an intermediate flex – between 50 and 75 – is a good starting point while 90 or 100 is a good place to start for those players who are fully grown.

Going up or down in flex will be determined by a few different factors that include playing style, strength and how skilled you are. Bear in mind that a player who isn’t as skilled and is still working on developing different facets of their game will struggle with a stick with a stiff flex (anything above 100) as it will not only limit your ability taking slap shots but wrist shots too.

If you’re a player who has a heavy slap shot, a stiffer flex would be best for you. In addition, physically strong players will not only have an easier time flexing stiffer sticks, they will gain more benefit from using one. The inverse is also true. If you’re slap shot is lacking and you aren’t as physically strong as others, going with a lighter flex will allow you to fully utilize your specific skill set.

Conferring with a Great Skate sales associate will also provide expert guidance to your specific needs when shopping in the store or online.

At the end of the day, finding a proper flex is going to be based largely off personal preference. But if you find a certain area of your game lacking, consider going up or down in flex to see if there is a noticeable difference.

CCM RBZ Grip Senior Hockey Stick 100 Flex

CCM RBZ Grip Senior Hockey Stick 100 Flex

Warrior Covert DT1 Senior Composite Hockey Stick - 85 Flex

Warrior Covert DT1 Senior Composite Hockey Stick – 85 Flex

Bauer Supreme Senior TotalOne NXG Hockey Stick - 77 Flex

Bauer Supreme Senior TotalOne NXG Hockey Stick – 77 Flex

Fighting the NHL Lockout Blues

With the NHL lockout continuing to drone along, many hockey fans have been without an entertainment staple for more than a number of months. While the NHL and NHLPA continue to dance around an agreement on the CBA, there are still a number of outlets where fans can get their hockey fix.

Although your weekly pickup or local league games might not do the trick, there is still plenty of hockey being shown across a number of different television networks. In addition, there is probably a good chance that some form of hockey is played at a high level somewhere near your hometown.

Between leagues like the AHL, ECHL and other minor professional leagues, a number of young NHL stars and up-and-coming prospects have been dispersed across the continent during the current work stoppage. While many NHL cities aren’t as lucky as Toronto – in which the AHL and NHL franchises are located down the street – there are plenty of opportunities to catch the action of your particular team’s farm club.

For those lucky enough to have a minor league team in their city, be sure to catch a game. The atmosphere at the games is always family friendly and the hockey is extremely entertaining.

The Canadian Hockey League – comprised of the QMJHL, OHL and WHL – is the most well known form of major junior hockey and has been regularly televised on the NHL Network. Not only are there plenty of teams to root for (68 in all) but there is a good chance that your favorite NHL team is represented in each league by a number of different prospects. Keeping track of the progress of these young players won’t only give you a window towards their NHL potential, but will certainly add new hockey knowledge to your repertoire.

Other junior leagues worth seeking out include but are not limited to the USHL and NAHL. Both leagues serve as the top two junior leagues in the United States and typically produce NCAA talent on a yearly basis. For those who are prospect nuts, the leagues are also great talent pools to monitor for upcoming NHL draft boards. The USHL had 13 players selected in last year’s draft and the league has quickly become a well-stocked pond for NHL talent.

The NCAA also offers a peek at upcoming NHL talent as the American collegiate body has become a tremendous breeding ground for talent. Although there are few Division I programs in the US, there is an impressive number of schools with varsity programs at the men’s and women’s level between DI and DIII. Since the majority of DI programs reside in the Northeast and Midwest, networks like NBC Sports, MSG, Big Ten and others regularly televise season games that bring the sport directly to you. The NBC Sports broadcasts have even pulled familiar faces from regular NHL broadcasts for this season and offer a high production value while often showcasing the nation’s best teams.

Most cable networks carry the channels that will not only bring NCAA hockey to your television, but various CHL games as well. Depending on how desperate you are to see hockey on your TV, there are readily available options on a weekly basis to view some of hockey’s best talent right from your own home.

Depending on where you live and how adventurous you are, exploring hockey in your own backyard will put your butt in the seat at an arena. Should you have a minor league professional team nearby (AHL, ECHL etc.) or a junior franchise, go check out a game. After all, live hockey is always best.

Should minor professional, junior or NCAA hockey not be an option there still should be some options nearby. Outside of scheduling a road trip with friends to catch a game out of town, there is certainly a good chance that an ACHA club resides in your area.

The ACHA is the governing body for club hockey in the United States and boasts over 400 member schools across five division (three men’s and two women’s) and are represented at some of the nation’s largest schools (Arizona State, Oklahoma, Illinois etc.). While the club level is still battling for respect on a national level, many of the power players are competing for talent right alongside NCAA programs. In fact, Penn State was the most recent school to make the jump from the ACHA to the NCAA. Finding out if your local state school has a club team would provide yet another source to quench your hockey craving.

Now that the holiday season has passed, take some time to fit hockey into your New Year’s resolution and maybe the NHL and PA will take the time to fit a CBA into theirs.